Foundational tuning: How infants' attention to speech predicts language development

Athena Vouloumanos, Suzanne Curtin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Orienting biases for speech may provide a foundation for language development. Although human infants show a bias for listening to speech from birth, the relation of a speech bias to later language development has not been established. Here, we examine whether infants' attention to speech directly predicts expressive vocabulary. Infants listened to speech or non-speech in a preferential listening procedure. Results show that infants' attention to speech at 12 months significantly predicted expressive vocabulary at 18 months, while indices of general development did not. No predictive relationships were found for infants' attention to non-speech, or overall attention to sounds, suggesting that the relationship between speech and expressive vocabulary was not a function of infants' general attentiveness. Potentially ancient evolutionary perceptual capacities such as biases for conspecific vocalizations may provide a foundation for proficiency in formal systems such language, much like the approximate number sense may provide a foundation for formal mathematics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1675-1686
Number of pages12
JournalCognitive Science
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Language Development
Tuning
Vocabulary
Mathematics
Language
Acoustic waves
Parturition
Expressive

Keywords

  • Cognitive development
  • Language acquisition
  • Longitudinal
  • Predictor
  • Speech perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Foundational tuning : How infants' attention to speech predicts language development. / Vouloumanos, Athena; Curtin, Suzanne.

In: Cognitive Science, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.11.2014, p. 1675-1686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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