Force-clamp spectroscopy of single-protein monomers reveals the individual unfolding and folding pathways of i27 and ubiquitin

Sergi Garcia-Manyes, Jasna Brujić, Carmen L. Badilla, Julio M. Fernández

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Single-protein force experiments have relied on a molecular fingerprint based on tethering multiple single-protein domains in a polyprotein chain. However, correlations between these domains remain an issue in interpreting force spectroscopy data, particularly during protein folding. Here we first show that force-clamp spectroscopy is a sensitive technique that provides a molecular fingerprint based on the unfolding step size of four single-monomer proteins. We then measure the force-dependent unfolding rate kinetics of ubiquitin and I27 monomers and find a good agreement with the data obtained for the respective polyproteins over a wide range of forces, in support of the Markovian hypothesis. Moreover, with a large statistical ensemble at a single force, we show that ubiquitin monomers also exhibit a broad distribution of unfolding times as a signature of disorder in the folded protein landscape. Furthermore, we readily capture the folding trajectories of monomers that exhibit the same stages in folding observed for polyproteins, thus eliminating the possibility of entropic masking by other unfolded modules in the chain or domain-domain interactions. On average, the time to reach the I27 folded length increases with increasing quenching force at a rate similar to that of the polyproteins. Force-clamp spectroscopy at the single-monomer level reproduces the kinetics of unfolding and refolding measured using polyproteins, which proves that there is no mechanical effect of tethering proteins to one another in the case of ubiquitin and I27.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)2436-2446
    Number of pages11
    JournalBiophysical Journal
    Volume93
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Oct 2007

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    Polyproteins
    Ubiquitin
    Spectrum Analysis
    Dermatoglyphics
    Proteins
    Protein Folding

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biophysics

    Cite this

    Force-clamp spectroscopy of single-protein monomers reveals the individual unfolding and folding pathways of i27 and ubiquitin. / Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Brujić, Jasna; Badilla, Carmen L.; Fernández, Julio M.

    In: Biophysical Journal, Vol. 93, No. 7, 10.2007, p. 2436-2446.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi ; Brujić, Jasna ; Badilla, Carmen L. ; Fernández, Julio M. / Force-clamp spectroscopy of single-protein monomers reveals the individual unfolding and folding pathways of i27 and ubiquitin. In: Biophysical Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 93, No. 7. pp. 2436-2446.
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