Food environments and childhood weight status: Effects of neighborhood median income

Lauren Fiechtner, Mona Sharifi, Thomas Sequist, Jason Block, Dustin Duncan, Steven J. Melly, Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman, Elsie M. Taveras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A key aspect of any intervention to improve obesity is to better understand the environment in which decisions are being made related to health behaviors, including the food environment. Methods: Our aim was to examine the extent to which proximity to six types of food establishments is associated with BMI z-score and explore potential effect modification of this relationship. We used geographical information software to determine proximity from 49,770 pediatric patients' residences to six types of food establishments. BMI z-score obtained from the electronic health record was the primary outcome. Results: In multivariable analyses, living in closest proximity to large (β, -0.09 units; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.13, -0.05) and small supermarkets (-0.08 units; 95% CI, -0.11, -0.04) was associated with lower BMI z-score; living in closest proximity to fast food (0.09 units; 95% CI, 0.03, 0.15) and full-service restaurants (0.07 units; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.14) was associated with a higher BMI z-score versus those living farthest away. Neighborhood median income was an effect modifier of the relationships of convenience stores and full-service restaurants with BMI z-score. In both cases, closest proximity to these establishments had more of an adverse effect on BMI z-score in lower-income neighborhoods. Conclusions: Living closer to supermarkets and farther from fast food and full-service restaurants was associated with lower BMI z-score. Neighborhood median income was an effect modifier; convenience stores and full-service restaurants had a stronger adverse effect on BMI z-score in lower-income neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-268
Number of pages9
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Fiechtner, L., Sharifi, M., Sequist, T., Block, J., Duncan, D., Melly, S. J., Rifas-Shiman, S. L., & Taveras, E. M. (2015). Food environments and childhood weight status: Effects of neighborhood median income. Childhood Obesity, 11(3), 260-268. https://doi.org/10.1089/chi.2014.0139