Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults

Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014)

Andrea C. Villanti, Amanda L. Johnson, Bridget K. Ambrose, K. Michael Cummings, Cassandra A. Stanton, Shyanika W. Rose, Shari P. Feirman, Cindy Tworek, Allison M. Glasser, Jennifer L. Pearson, Amy M. Cohn, Kevin P. Conway, Raymond Niaura, Maansi Bansal-Travers, Andrew Hyland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act banned characterizing flavors other than menthol in cigarettes but did not restrict their use in other forms of tobacco (e.g., smokeless, cigars, hookah, e-cigarettes). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of Wave 1 data from 45,971 U.S. adults and youth, aged ≥12 years in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study collected in 2013–2014, was conducted in 2016. This study examined (1) the prevalence and reasons for use of flavored tobacco products; (2) the proportion of ever tobacco users reporting that their first product was flavored; and (3) correlates of current flavored tobacco product use. Results Current flavored (including menthol) tobacco product use was highest in youth (80%, aged 12–17 years); and young adult tobacco users (73%, aged 18–24 years); and lowest in older adult tobacco users aged ≥65 years (29%). Flavor was a primary reason for using a given tobacco product, particularly among youth. Eighty-one percent of youth and 86% of young adult ever tobacco users reported that their first product was flavored versus 54% of adults aged ≥25 years. In multivariable models, reporting that one's first tobacco product was flavored was associated with a 13% higher prevalence of current tobacco use among youth ever tobacco users and a 32% higher prevalence of current tobacco use among adult ever users. Conclusions These results add to the evidence base that flavored tobacco products may attract young users and serve as starter products to regular tobacco use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-151
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use
Tobacco Products
Tobacco
Health
Population
Menthol
Young Adult
Smokeless Tobacco
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Villanti, A. C., Johnson, A. L., Ambrose, B. K., Cummings, K. M., Stanton, C. A., Rose, S. W., ... Hyland, A. (2017). Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults: Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014). American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 53(2), 139-151. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.026

Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults : Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014). / Villanti, Andrea C.; Johnson, Amanda L.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Cummings, K. Michael; Stanton, Cassandra A.; Rose, Shyanika W.; Feirman, Shari P.; Tworek, Cindy; Glasser, Allison M.; Pearson, Jennifer L.; Cohn, Amy M.; Conway, Kevin P.; Niaura, Raymond; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 2, 01.08.2017, p. 139-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Villanti, AC, Johnson, AL, Ambrose, BK, Cummings, KM, Stanton, CA, Rose, SW, Feirman, SP, Tworek, C, Glasser, AM, Pearson, JL, Cohn, AM, Conway, KP, Niaura, R, Bansal-Travers, M & Hyland, A 2017, 'Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults: Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014)', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 139-151. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.026
Villanti, Andrea C. ; Johnson, Amanda L. ; Ambrose, Bridget K. ; Cummings, K. Michael ; Stanton, Cassandra A. ; Rose, Shyanika W. ; Feirman, Shari P. ; Tworek, Cindy ; Glasser, Allison M. ; Pearson, Jennifer L. ; Cohn, Amy M. ; Conway, Kevin P. ; Niaura, Raymond ; Bansal-Travers, Maansi ; Hyland, Andrew. / Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults : Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014). In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 139-151.
@article{1f75f290eddf4a52a9ac5df9a92d7fdc,
title = "Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults: Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014)",
abstract = "Introduction The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act banned characterizing flavors other than menthol in cigarettes but did not restrict their use in other forms of tobacco (e.g., smokeless, cigars, hookah, e-cigarettes). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of Wave 1 data from 45,971 U.S. adults and youth, aged ≥12 years in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study collected in 2013–2014, was conducted in 2016. This study examined (1) the prevalence and reasons for use of flavored tobacco products; (2) the proportion of ever tobacco users reporting that their first product was flavored; and (3) correlates of current flavored tobacco product use. Results Current flavored (including menthol) tobacco product use was highest in youth (80{\%}, aged 12–17 years); and young adult tobacco users (73{\%}, aged 18–24 years); and lowest in older adult tobacco users aged ≥65 years (29{\%}). Flavor was a primary reason for using a given tobacco product, particularly among youth. Eighty-one percent of youth and 86{\%} of young adult ever tobacco users reported that their first product was flavored versus 54{\%} of adults aged ≥25 years. In multivariable models, reporting that one's first tobacco product was flavored was associated with a 13{\%} higher prevalence of current tobacco use among youth ever tobacco users and a 32{\%} higher prevalence of current tobacco use among adult ever users. Conclusions These results add to the evidence base that flavored tobacco products may attract young users and serve as starter products to regular tobacco use.",
author = "Villanti, {Andrea C.} and Johnson, {Amanda L.} and Ambrose, {Bridget K.} and Cummings, {K. Michael} and Stanton, {Cassandra A.} and Rose, {Shyanika W.} and Feirman, {Shari P.} and Cindy Tworek and Glasser, {Allison M.} and Pearson, {Jennifer L.} and Cohn, {Amy M.} and Conway, {Kevin P.} and Raymond Niaura and Maansi Bansal-Travers and Andrew Hyland",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.026",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "139--151",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults

T2 - Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014)

AU - Villanti, Andrea C.

AU - Johnson, Amanda L.

AU - Ambrose, Bridget K.

AU - Cummings, K. Michael

AU - Stanton, Cassandra A.

AU - Rose, Shyanika W.

AU - Feirman, Shari P.

AU - Tworek, Cindy

AU - Glasser, Allison M.

AU - Pearson, Jennifer L.

AU - Cohn, Amy M.

AU - Conway, Kevin P.

AU - Niaura, Raymond

AU - Bansal-Travers, Maansi

AU - Hyland, Andrew

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Introduction The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act banned characterizing flavors other than menthol in cigarettes but did not restrict their use in other forms of tobacco (e.g., smokeless, cigars, hookah, e-cigarettes). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of Wave 1 data from 45,971 U.S. adults and youth, aged ≥12 years in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study collected in 2013–2014, was conducted in 2016. This study examined (1) the prevalence and reasons for use of flavored tobacco products; (2) the proportion of ever tobacco users reporting that their first product was flavored; and (3) correlates of current flavored tobacco product use. Results Current flavored (including menthol) tobacco product use was highest in youth (80%, aged 12–17 years); and young adult tobacco users (73%, aged 18–24 years); and lowest in older adult tobacco users aged ≥65 years (29%). Flavor was a primary reason for using a given tobacco product, particularly among youth. Eighty-one percent of youth and 86% of young adult ever tobacco users reported that their first product was flavored versus 54% of adults aged ≥25 years. In multivariable models, reporting that one's first tobacco product was flavored was associated with a 13% higher prevalence of current tobacco use among youth ever tobacco users and a 32% higher prevalence of current tobacco use among adult ever users. Conclusions These results add to the evidence base that flavored tobacco products may attract young users and serve as starter products to regular tobacco use.

AB - Introduction The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act banned characterizing flavors other than menthol in cigarettes but did not restrict their use in other forms of tobacco (e.g., smokeless, cigars, hookah, e-cigarettes). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of Wave 1 data from 45,971 U.S. adults and youth, aged ≥12 years in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study collected in 2013–2014, was conducted in 2016. This study examined (1) the prevalence and reasons for use of flavored tobacco products; (2) the proportion of ever tobacco users reporting that their first product was flavored; and (3) correlates of current flavored tobacco product use. Results Current flavored (including menthol) tobacco product use was highest in youth (80%, aged 12–17 years); and young adult tobacco users (73%, aged 18–24 years); and lowest in older adult tobacco users aged ≥65 years (29%). Flavor was a primary reason for using a given tobacco product, particularly among youth. Eighty-one percent of youth and 86% of young adult ever tobacco users reported that their first product was flavored versus 54% of adults aged ≥25 years. In multivariable models, reporting that one's first tobacco product was flavored was associated with a 13% higher prevalence of current tobacco use among youth ever tobacco users and a 32% higher prevalence of current tobacco use among adult ever users. Conclusions These results add to the evidence base that flavored tobacco products may attract young users and serve as starter products to regular tobacco use.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015272994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015272994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.026

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.026

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 139

EP - 151

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 2

ER -