Financing pediatric education in community settings

Michael Weitzman, Lynn C. Garfunkel, Suzanne Connaughton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increasingly, hospital-based pediatric outpatient departments are recognized as settings that attempt to combine two critical, but not always compatible, mandates: (1) education of medical students and pediatric residents in outpatient pediatrics, and (2) service, often with inadequate resources, to a socially high-risk population with a disproportionately high prevalence of social, family, and psychological dysfunction. Coexistence of these two mandates has raised a number of concerns, because pediatric ambulatory care education and training have historically been based almost exclusively in a hospital setting. Trainees often get a false impression of the types of problems they will be dealing with in pediatric primary care and of how an efficient pediatric practice is managed. In addition, they often are supervised by full-time faculty who have little if any experience in community settings and who practice only part time or not at all. These problems have led to a widespread desire to train pediatric residents outside the hospital, in settings that more closely approximate the places in which they will practice in the future. Residency programs that address this issue also provide residents with the opportunity to be trained by seasoned practitioners whose primary professional responsibility is the outpatient care of children. To date, little has been written about the cost or the financing of such educational efforts. This article summarizes what is known about the costs. We also attempt to specify the costs that should be anticipated for the various components and steps involved in devising and implementing pediatric community-based educational programs and to describe potential sources of funding for such programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1284-1288
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume98
Issue number6 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Education
Ambulatory Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Outpatients
Pediatric Hospitals
Internship and Residency
Medical Students
Primary Health Care
Psychology
Population

Keywords

  • ambulatory care
  • community-based care
  • financing
  • pediatric education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Weitzman, M., Garfunkel, L. C., & Connaughton, S. (1996). Financing pediatric education in community settings. Pediatrics, 98(6 SUPPL.), 1284-1288.

Financing pediatric education in community settings. / Weitzman, Michael; Garfunkel, Lynn C.; Connaughton, Suzanne.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 98, No. 6 SUPPL., 01.12.1996, p. 1284-1288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weitzman, M, Garfunkel, LC & Connaughton, S 1996, 'Financing pediatric education in community settings', Pediatrics, vol. 98, no. 6 SUPPL., pp. 1284-1288.
Weitzman M, Garfunkel LC, Connaughton S. Financing pediatric education in community settings. Pediatrics. 1996 Dec 1;98(6 SUPPL.):1284-1288.
Weitzman, Michael ; Garfunkel, Lynn C. ; Connaughton, Suzanne. / Financing pediatric education in community settings. In: Pediatrics. 1996 ; Vol. 98, No. 6 SUPPL. pp. 1284-1288.
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