Feminist Critiques of the Separative Model of Self

Implications for Rational Choice Theory

Paula England, Barbara Stanek Kilbourne

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The article applies the radical-cultural feminist critique of the separative model of self to rational choice theories. Four assumptions of neoclassical economics-the “ideal type” of rational choice theories-are identified: selfishness; that interpersonal utility comparisons are impossible; that tastes are exogenous and unchanging; and that individuals are rational. For the most part, sociological versions of rational choice theories rely on these same assumptions. The article shows that a separative rather than a connected model of the self underlies each of these assumptions.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)156-171
    Number of pages16
    JournalRationality and Society
    Volume2
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1990

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    rational choice theory
    ideal type
    economics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Feminist Critiques of the Separative Model of Self : Implications for Rational Choice Theory. / England, Paula; Kilbourne, Barbara Stanek.

    In: Rationality and Society, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1990, p. 156-171.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    England, Paula ; Kilbourne, Barbara Stanek. / Feminist Critiques of the Separative Model of Self : Implications for Rational Choice Theory. In: Rationality and Society. 1990 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 156-171.
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