female forms of power and the myth of male dominance

a model of female/male interaction in peasant society

SUSAN CAROL ROGERS

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The assumption of universal male dominance, which stems from epistemological biases in anthropology, is belied by evidence that women wield considerable power within the context of the peasant household and community. The apparent contradictions between public stances of male dominance and the realities of female power can be resolved and explained by a model which is potentially extensible to other types of pre‐industrial societies. In conclusion, the transformation of male dominance from myth to reality during the process of industrialization is briefly explored. 1975 American Anthropological Association

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)727-756
    Number of pages30
    JournalAmerican Ethnologist
    Volume2
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1975

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    peasant
    myth
    interaction
    pre-industrial society
    industrialization
    anthropology
    trend
    community
    evidence
    Society

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Anthropology

    Cite this

    female forms of power and the myth of male dominance : a model of female/male interaction in peasant society. / ROGERS, SUSAN CAROL.

    In: American Ethnologist, Vol. 2, No. 4, 1975, p. 727-756.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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