Feeding the hand that bit you: Voring for ex-authoritarian rulers in Russia and Bolivia

Amber L. Seligson, Joshua Tucker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    what could be motivating voters in transition countries to vote for leaders who have proven themselves to be skilled at violating human rights, repressing civil liberties, and ruling without democratic institutions? We test hypotheses related to this question by using a least-similar-systems design in which we search for common predictors of vote choice in presidential elections from two countries that differ in their past and present political and economic situations: Bolivia and Russia. We find consistent patterns in these two very different countries, which leads to the conclusion that voters for ex-authoritarian candidates or parties are not merely motivated by considerations that typically shape vote choice in long-standing democracies, but are also distinguished by a preference for non-democratic political systems.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)11-42
    Number of pages32
    JournalDemokratizatsiya
    Volume13
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Dec 2005

    Fingerprint

    political system
    Bolivia
    human rights
    election
    democracy
    voter
    Russia
    political situation
    economic situation
    presidential election
    candidacy
    leader
    present
    test
    ruling

    Keywords

    • Authoritarianism
    • Bolivia
    • Elections
    • Russia

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Political Science and International Relations

    Cite this

    Feeding the hand that bit you : Voring for ex-authoritarian rulers in Russia and Bolivia. / Seligson, Amber L.; Tucker, Joshua.

    In: Demokratizatsiya, Vol. 13, No. 1, 12.2005, p. 11-42.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Seligson, Amber L. ; Tucker, Joshua. / Feeding the hand that bit you : Voring for ex-authoritarian rulers in Russia and Bolivia. In: Demokratizatsiya. 2005 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 11-42.
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