Feasibility of Assessing Sodium-Associated Body Fluid Composition in End-Stage Renal Disease

Maya Clark-Cutaia, Nathaniel Reisinger, Maria Rita Anache, Kara Ramos, Marilyn S. Sommers, Raymond R. Townsend, Gary Yu, Jamison Fargo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular disease accounts for more than half of all deaths in the hemodialysis (HD) population. Although much of this mortality is associated with fluid overload (FO), FO is difficult to measure, and many HD patients have significant pulmonary congestion despite the absence of clinical presentation. Cohort studies have observed that FO, as measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS), correlates with mortality. Other studies have observed that lower sodium intake is associated with less fluid-related weight gain, improved hypertension, and survival. Whether sodium intake influences FO in HD patients as measured by BIS is not known. Objective: The aims of the study were to determine the feasibility of assessing the impact of sodium restriction on body fluid composition as measured by BIS among patients with three levels of sodium intake and to determine if there are statistical and/or clinical differences in BIS measures across sodium intake groups. Methods: We used a double-blinded randomized controlled trial design with three levels of sodium restriction, 2,400 mg per day, 1,500 mg per day, and unrestricted (control group), to test our aims. Forty-two HD patients from a tertiary acute care academic institution associated with three urban DaVita dialysis centers were enrolled. Participants remained in the inpatient center for 5 days and 4 nights and were randomly assigned to sodium intake groups. Body fluid composition was measured with BIS. Results: Recruitment, enrollment, and retention statistics supported the feasibility of the study design. Regression analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences among sodium intake groups on any of the outcomes. Discussion: Our data suggest the need for additional research into the effects of sodium restriction on body fluid composition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-252
Number of pages7
JournalNursing Research
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Body Fluids
Body Composition
Chronic Kidney Failure
Sodium
Spectrum Analysis
Renal Dialysis
Mortality
Feasibility Studies
Tertiary Healthcare
Weight Gain
Inpatients
Dialysis
Cohort Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Randomized Controlled Trials
Regression Analysis
Hypertension
Lung
Control Groups
Survival

Keywords

  • body composition
  • kidney failure, chronic
  • renal dialysis
  • sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Clark-Cutaia, M., Reisinger, N., Anache, M. R., Ramos, K., Sommers, M. S., Townsend, R. R., ... Fargo, J. (2019). Feasibility of Assessing Sodium-Associated Body Fluid Composition in End-Stage Renal Disease. Nursing Research, 68(3), 246-252. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNR.0000000000000320

Feasibility of Assessing Sodium-Associated Body Fluid Composition in End-Stage Renal Disease. / Clark-Cutaia, Maya; Reisinger, Nathaniel; Anache, Maria Rita; Ramos, Kara; Sommers, Marilyn S.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Yu, Gary; Fargo, Jamison.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 68, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 246-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clark-Cutaia, M, Reisinger, N, Anache, MR, Ramos, K, Sommers, MS, Townsend, RR, Yu, G & Fargo, J 2019, 'Feasibility of Assessing Sodium-Associated Body Fluid Composition in End-Stage Renal Disease', Nursing Research, vol. 68, no. 3, pp. 246-252. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNR.0000000000000320
Clark-Cutaia, Maya ; Reisinger, Nathaniel ; Anache, Maria Rita ; Ramos, Kara ; Sommers, Marilyn S. ; Townsend, Raymond R. ; Yu, Gary ; Fargo, Jamison. / Feasibility of Assessing Sodium-Associated Body Fluid Composition in End-Stage Renal Disease. In: Nursing Research. 2019 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 246-252.
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