Family-related correlates of sexually transmitted disease and barriers to care

A pilot study of pregnant African American adolescents

Richard A. Crosby, Gina M. Wingood, Ralph DiClemente, Eve S. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored associations between family-related measures and sexually transmitted disease (STD) history among 170 pregnant African American adolescent females, 14 to 20 years of age, attending prenatal care clinics in a large urban area of the South. Measures of low family support and infrequent mother-daughter communication were significant bivariate correlates of having at least one STD. Mother-daughter communication about preventing acquired immune deficiency syndrome remained significant in a multivariate model. The study also explored barriers to STD care-seeking behavior and found that few adolescents perceived access or financial issues as reasons to delay entry into the medical system. Low perceived family support was marginally associated with greater perceived barriers to STD care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
African Americans
Nuclear Family
Communication
Mothers
Prenatal Care
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African American
  • Barriers to care
  • Family
  • HIV
  • Pregnancy
  • STD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Family-related correlates of sexually transmitted disease and barriers to care : A pilot study of pregnant African American adolescents. / Crosby, Richard A.; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph; Rose, Eve S.

In: Family and Community Health, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 16-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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