Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents

Kimberly G. Noble, Suzanne M. Houston, Natalie Brito, Hauke Bartsch, Eric Kan, Joshua M. Kuperman, Natacha Akshoomoff, David G. Amaral, Cinnamon S. Bloss, Ondrej Libiger, Nicholas J. Schork, Sarah S. Murray, B. J. Casey, Linda Chang, Thomas M. Ernst, Jean A. Frazier, Jeffrey R. Gruen, David N. Kennedy, Peter Van Zijl, Stewart Mostofsky & 5 others Walter E. Kaufmann, Tal Kenet, Anders M. Dale, Terry L. Jernigan, Elizabeth R. Sowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Socioeconomic disparities are associated with differences in cognitive development. The extent to which this translates to disparities in brain structure is unclear. We investigated relationships between socioeconomic factors and brain morphometry, independently of genetic ancestry, among a cohort of 1,099 typically developing individuals between 3 and 20 years of age. Income was logarithmically associated with brain surface area. Among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in surface area, whereas, among children from higher income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills; surface area mediated socioeconomic differences in certain neurocognitive abilities. These data imply that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-778
Number of pages6
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 28 2015

Fingerprint

Education
Brain
Aptitude
Executive Function
Vulnerable Populations
Reading
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Noble, K. G., Houston, S. M., Brito, N., Bartsch, H., Kan, E., Kuperman, J. M., ... Sowell, E. R. (2015). Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents. Nature Neuroscience, 18(5), 773-778. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.3983

Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents. / Noble, Kimberly G.; Houston, Suzanne M.; Brito, Natalie; Bartsch, Hauke; Kan, Eric; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.; Murray, Sarah S.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean A.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kennedy, David N.; Van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Kenet, Tal; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 18, No. 5, 28.04.2015, p. 773-778.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noble, KG, Houston, SM, Brito, N, Bartsch, H, Kan, E, Kuperman, JM, Akshoomoff, N, Amaral, DG, Bloss, CS, Libiger, O, Schork, NJ, Murray, SS, Casey, BJ, Chang, L, Ernst, TM, Frazier, JA, Gruen, JR, Kennedy, DN, Van Zijl, P, Mostofsky, S, Kaufmann, WE, Kenet, T, Dale, AM, Jernigan, TL & Sowell, ER 2015, 'Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents', Nature Neuroscience, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 773-778. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.3983
Noble, Kimberly G. ; Houston, Suzanne M. ; Brito, Natalie ; Bartsch, Hauke ; Kan, Eric ; Kuperman, Joshua M. ; Akshoomoff, Natacha ; Amaral, David G. ; Bloss, Cinnamon S. ; Libiger, Ondrej ; Schork, Nicholas J. ; Murray, Sarah S. ; Casey, B. J. ; Chang, Linda ; Ernst, Thomas M. ; Frazier, Jean A. ; Gruen, Jeffrey R. ; Kennedy, David N. ; Van Zijl, Peter ; Mostofsky, Stewart ; Kaufmann, Walter E. ; Kenet, Tal ; Dale, Anders M. ; Jernigan, Terry L. ; Sowell, Elizabeth R. / Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 773-778.
@article{5a6786813cc8463b8cdcadba810effbe,
title = "Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents",
abstract = "Socioeconomic disparities are associated with differences in cognitive development. The extent to which this translates to disparities in brain structure is unclear. We investigated relationships between socioeconomic factors and brain morphometry, independently of genetic ancestry, among a cohort of 1,099 typically developing individuals between 3 and 20 years of age. Income was logarithmically associated with brain surface area. Among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in surface area, whereas, among children from higher income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills; surface area mediated socioeconomic differences in certain neurocognitive abilities. These data imply that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children.",
author = "Noble, {Kimberly G.} and Houston, {Suzanne M.} and Natalie Brito and Hauke Bartsch and Eric Kan and Kuperman, {Joshua M.} and Natacha Akshoomoff and Amaral, {David G.} and Bloss, {Cinnamon S.} and Ondrej Libiger and Schork, {Nicholas J.} and Murray, {Sarah S.} and Casey, {B. J.} and Linda Chang and Ernst, {Thomas M.} and Frazier, {Jean A.} and Gruen, {Jeffrey R.} and Kennedy, {David N.} and {Van Zijl}, Peter and Stewart Mostofsky and Kaufmann, {Walter E.} and Tal Kenet and Dale, {Anders M.} and Jernigan, {Terry L.} and Sowell, {Elizabeth R.}",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1038/nn.3983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "773--778",
journal = "Nature Neuroscience",
issn = "1097-6256",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents

AU - Noble, Kimberly G.

AU - Houston, Suzanne M.

AU - Brito, Natalie

AU - Bartsch, Hauke

AU - Kan, Eric

AU - Kuperman, Joshua M.

AU - Akshoomoff, Natacha

AU - Amaral, David G.

AU - Bloss, Cinnamon S.

AU - Libiger, Ondrej

AU - Schork, Nicholas J.

AU - Murray, Sarah S.

AU - Casey, B. J.

AU - Chang, Linda

AU - Ernst, Thomas M.

AU - Frazier, Jean A.

AU - Gruen, Jeffrey R.

AU - Kennedy, David N.

AU - Van Zijl, Peter

AU - Mostofsky, Stewart

AU - Kaufmann, Walter E.

AU - Kenet, Tal

AU - Dale, Anders M.

AU - Jernigan, Terry L.

AU - Sowell, Elizabeth R.

PY - 2015/4/28

Y1 - 2015/4/28

N2 - Socioeconomic disparities are associated with differences in cognitive development. The extent to which this translates to disparities in brain structure is unclear. We investigated relationships between socioeconomic factors and brain morphometry, independently of genetic ancestry, among a cohort of 1,099 typically developing individuals between 3 and 20 years of age. Income was logarithmically associated with brain surface area. Among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in surface area, whereas, among children from higher income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills; surface area mediated socioeconomic differences in certain neurocognitive abilities. These data imply that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children.

AB - Socioeconomic disparities are associated with differences in cognitive development. The extent to which this translates to disparities in brain structure is unclear. We investigated relationships between socioeconomic factors and brain morphometry, independently of genetic ancestry, among a cohort of 1,099 typically developing individuals between 3 and 20 years of age. Income was logarithmically associated with brain surface area. Among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in surface area, whereas, among children from higher income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills; surface area mediated socioeconomic differences in certain neurocognitive abilities. These data imply that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928705793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928705793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nn.3983

DO - 10.1038/nn.3983

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 773

EP - 778

JO - Nature Neuroscience

JF - Nature Neuroscience

SN - 1097-6256

IS - 5

ER -