Family- and Neighborhood-Level Factors as Predictors of Conduct Problems in School among Young, Urban, Minority Children

Joseph J. Palamar, Esther J. Calzada, Rachelle Theise, Keng Yen Huang, Eva Petkova, Laurie Miller Brotman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Minority children attending schools in urban socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods are at high risk for conduct problems. Although a number of family and neighborhood characteristics have been implicated in the onset and progression of conduct problems, there remains incomplete understanding of the unique contributions of poverty-related factors early in development. This prospective study of 298 black public school children considered family- and neighborhood-level predictors of teacher-reported conduct problems from pre-kindergarten through first grade. Results from multi-level analyses indicate that percentage of poor residents in a student's neighborhood made a robust independent contribution to the prediction of development of conduct problems, over and above family- and other neighborhood-level demographic factors. For children of single parents, the percentage of black residents in the neighborhood also predicted the development of conduct problems. School-based interventions to prevent conduct problems should consider impact for children at highest risk based on neighborhood poverty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-185
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioral Medicine
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2015

Keywords

  • behavioral problems
  • early childhood
  • neighborhood
  • poverty
  • urban schools

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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