Familial dyadic patterns in defenses and object relations

Samuel Juni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Defense Mechanisms Inventory was administered to 308 sets of marital couples, and adult sons or daughters. The inventory yields five defensive clusters as well as a composite object relations measure. Correlational analyses were aimed at determining the extent to which defensive and object relations styles generalize within the family. Results showed consistent similarities across the family in object relations styles and in acting out defenses. Dyadic analyses showed striking similarities between Husband-Wife, Father-Son, and Mother-Daughter, but not for Father-Daughter and Mother-Son dyads. Results are discussed in context of modeling, sex role, and systems theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-268
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Family Therapy
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1992

Fingerprint

Nuclear Family
Adult Children
father
Spouses
Fathers
defense mechanism
role theory
Mothers
Acting Out
system theory
dyad
Systems Theory
Equipment and Supplies
husband
wife
Defense Mechanisms
Object Attachment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Familial dyadic patterns in defenses and object relations. / Juni, Samuel.

In: Contemporary Family Therapy, Vol. 14, No. 3, 06.1992, p. 259-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Juni, Samuel. / Familial dyadic patterns in defenses and object relations. In: Contemporary Family Therapy. 1992 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 259-268.
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