Fake news and partisan epistemology

Regina Rini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper does four things: (1) It provides an analysis of the concept ‘fake news.' (2) It identifies distinctive epistemic features of social media testimony. (3) It argues that partisanship-in-testimony-reception is not always epistemically vicious; in fact some forms of partisanship are consistent with individual epistemic virtue. (4) It argues that a solution to the problem of fake news will require changes to institutions, such as social media platforms, not just to individual epistemic practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E-43-E-64
JournalKennedy Institute of Ethics Journal
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Social Media
social media
testimony
epistemology
news
Partisan
Partisanship
Epistemology
Fake
Testimony
News
Epistemic Virtue
Epistemic Practices
Reception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health Policy
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Fake news and partisan epistemology. / Rini, Regina.

In: Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. E-43-E-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rini, Regina. / Fake news and partisan epistemology. In: Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. E-43-E-64.
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