Factors related to perceived diabetes control are not related to actual glucose control for minority patients with diabetes

Lisa M. McAndrew, Carol R. Horowitz, Kristie Lancaster, Howard Leventhal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE- To examine variables associated with perceived diabetes control compared with an objective measure of glucose control (A1C). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- Beliefs about diabetes were assessed among 334 individuals with diabetes living in a primarily low-income, minority, urban neighborhood. Regression analyses tested associations between disease beliefs and both participants' perceptions of control and actual control (A1C). RESULTS- Poorer perceived diabetes control was associated with perceiving a greater impact of diabetes, greater depressive symptoms, not following a diabetic diet, A1C, and a trend toward less exercise. Variables associated with better actual control (A1C) included higher BMI, older age, and not using insulin. CONCLUSIONS- Patients' perceptions of their diabetes control are informed by subjective diabetes cues (e.g., perceived impact of diabetes and adherence to a diabetic diet), which are not related to A1C. Clinicians should take into account what cues patients are using to assess their diabetes control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)736-738
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

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Diabetic Diet
Cues
Glucose
Research Design
Regression Analysis
Exercise
Insulin
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Factors related to perceived diabetes control are not related to actual glucose control for minority patients with diabetes. / McAndrew, Lisa M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Lancaster, Kristie; Leventhal, Howard.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 33, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 736-738.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McAndrew, Lisa M. ; Horowitz, Carol R. ; Lancaster, Kristie ; Leventhal, Howard. / Factors related to perceived diabetes control are not related to actual glucose control for minority patients with diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 736-738.
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