Factors influencing independence in adolescents with sickle cell disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Problem: Factors that predict successful transition from pediatric to adult care for adolescents with sickle cell disease are not fully understood, making transfer decisions difficult. Methods: Seventy-four adolescents (14-21 years) participated in this descriptive correlational study to investigate the relationships of age, gender, knowledge about sickle cell disease, disease severity, and family relationships to independence. Findings: Knowledge, severity, and family relationships explained only 25% of the variance for independence in the final model; family relationships were inversely correlated. Conclusions: Factors exerting stronger influences on independence remain unknown. Cultural factors may be important among this predominantly African American population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-185
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

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Family Relations
Sickle Cell Anemia
Transition to Adult Care
African Americans
Decision Making
Population

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Chronic disease in childhood
  • Independence
  • Psychosocial development
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Transition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Factors influencing independence in adolescents with sickle cell disease. / Newland, Jamesetta.

In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2008, p. 177-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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