Factors associated with interest in initiating treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among young HCV-infected injection drug users

Steffanie A. Strathdee, M. Latka, J. Campbell, P. T. O'Driscoll, E. T. Golub, F. Kapadia, R. A. Pollini, R. S. Garfein, D. L. Thomas, H. Hagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. We sought to identify factors associated with interest in receiving therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among HCV-infected injection drug users (IDUs) in 3 United States cities. Methods. IDUs aged 18-35 years who were HCV-infected and seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus underwent surveys on behaviors, experience, and interest in treatment for HCV infection and readiness to quit drug use. Results. Among treatment-naive IDUs (n = 216), 81.5% were interested in treatment for HCV infection, but only 27.3% had seen a health-care provider since receiving a diagnosis of HCV infection. Interest in treatment for HCV infection was greater among IDUs with a high perceived threat of progressive liver disease, those with a usual source of care, those without evidence of alcohol dependence, and those with higher readiness scores for quitting drug use. Interest in treatment for HCV infection was 7-fold higher among IDUs who were told by their health-care provider that they were at risk for cirrhosis or liver cancer. Conclusions. Improving provider-patient communication and integrating treatments for substance abuse and HCV may increase the proportion of IDUs who initiate treatment for HCV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume40
Issue numberSUPPL. 5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2005

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Virus Diseases
Drug Users
Hepacivirus
Injections
Therapeutics
Health Personnel
Liver Neoplasms
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders
Liver Diseases
Fibrosis
Communication
HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Factors associated with interest in initiating treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among young HCV-infected injection drug users. / Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Latka, M.; Campbell, J.; O'Driscoll, P. T.; Golub, E. T.; Kapadia, F.; Pollini, R. A.; Garfein, R. S.; Thomas, D. L.; Hagan, H.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 40, No. SUPPL. 5, 15.04.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strathdee, Steffanie A. ; Latka, M. ; Campbell, J. ; O'Driscoll, P. T. ; Golub, E. T. ; Kapadia, F. ; Pollini, R. A. ; Garfein, R. S. ; Thomas, D. L. ; Hagan, H. / Factors associated with interest in initiating treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among young HCV-infected injection drug users. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005 ; Vol. 40, No. SUPPL. 5.
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