Expressing Pride: Effects on Perceived Agency, Communality, and Stereotype-Based Gender Disparities

Prisca Brosi, Matthias Spörrle, Isabell M. Welpe, Madeline Heilman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two experimental studies were conducted to investigate how the expression of pride shapes agency-related and communality-related judgments, and how those judgments differ when the pride expresser is a man or a woman. Results indicated that the expression of pride (as compared to the expression of happiness) had positive effects on perceptions of agency and inferences about task-oriented leadership competence, and negative effects on perceptions of communality and inferences about people-oriented leadership competence. Pride expression also elevated ascriptions of interpersonal hostility. For agency-related judgments and ascriptions of interpersonal hostility, these effects were consistently stronger when the pride expresser was a woman than a man. Moreover, the expression of pride was found to affect disparities in judgments about men and women, eliminating the stereotype-consistent differences that were evident when happiness was expressed. With a display of pride women were not seen as any more deficient in agency-related attributes and competencies, nor were they seen as any more exceptional in communality-related attributes and competencies, than were men. (PsycINFO Database Record

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 9 2016

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Happiness
Hostility
Mental Competency

Keywords

  • Agency
  • Communality
  • Gender stereotypes
  • Leadership competence
  • Pride expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Expressing Pride : Effects on Perceived Agency, Communality, and Stereotype-Based Gender Disparities. / Brosi, Prisca; Spörrle, Matthias; Welpe, Isabell M.; Heilman, Madeline.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, 09.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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