Exploring school engagement of middle-class African American adolescents

Selcuk R. Sirin, Lauren Rogers-Sirin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because of the scarcity of knowledge about middle-class African American adolescents, the present study explored psychological and parental factors in relation to academic performance. The participants were 336 middle-class African American students and their biological mothers. The findings suggest that for African American middle-class adolescents, educational expectations and school engagement have the strongest relation to academic performance. Self-esteem was not related to academic performance. The results also indicate that positive parent-adolescent relationships, not parents' educational values, were related to better academic performance. Implications for school counselors are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-340
Number of pages18
JournalYouth and Society
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

middle class
adolescent
school
performance
parents
school counselor
self-esteem
American
Values
student

Keywords

  • Black adolescents
  • Engagement
  • Expectation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Exploring school engagement of middle-class African American adolescents. / Sirin, Selcuk R.; Rogers-Sirin, Lauren.

In: Youth and Society, Vol. 35, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 323-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sirin, Selcuk R. ; Rogers-Sirin, Lauren. / Exploring school engagement of middle-class African American adolescents. In: Youth and Society. 2004 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 323-340.
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