Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women

Bess H. Marcus, Anna E. Albrecht, Raymond Niaura, Elaine R. Taylor, Laurey R. Simkin, Susan I. Feder, David Abrams, Paul D. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the effects of physical exercise on smoking relapse. Twenty previously sedentary female smokers were randomly assigned to smoking cessation plus exercise or smoking cessation with frequency contact control. The smoking cessation program included 12 professionally led sessions over 12 weeks. Exercise treatment included three supervised exercise sessions per week for 15 weeks. Contact control included three women's health/wellness lectures per week for 15 weeks. Smoking abstinence was validated by carbon monoxide and saliva cotinine. Mean exercise attendance for exercise subjects was 88% with an increase in estimated VO2 of 25%. The percentage of subjects who quit for 24 hours was 80% for the exercise and 90% for the contact group. One subject in the contact group remained abstinent at the end of the 12-week treatment and at 1-, 3-, and 12-month follow-ups, whereas three subjects in the exercise group were abstinent at these time points. These results suggest that exercise training improves short-term quit rates and may prove a useful strategy for long-term maintenance of smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Maintenance
Exercise
Cotinine
Carbon Monoxide
Smoking
Women's Health
Saliva
Recurrence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Marcus, B. H., Albrecht, A. E., Niaura, R., Taylor, E. R., Simkin, L. R., Feder, S. I., ... Thompson, P. D. (1995). Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women. Addictive Behaviors, 20(1), 87-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/0306-4603(94)00048-4

Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women. / Marcus, Bess H.; Albrecht, Anna E.; Niaura, Raymond; Taylor, Elaine R.; Simkin, Laurey R.; Feder, Susan I.; Abrams, David; Thompson, Paul D.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 20, No. 1, 1995, p. 87-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marcus, BH, Albrecht, AE, Niaura, R, Taylor, ER, Simkin, LR, Feder, SI, Abrams, D & Thompson, PD 1995, 'Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women', Addictive Behaviors, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 87-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/0306-4603(94)00048-4
Marcus, Bess H. ; Albrecht, Anna E. ; Niaura, Raymond ; Taylor, Elaine R. ; Simkin, Laurey R. ; Feder, Susan I. ; Abrams, David ; Thompson, Paul D. / Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women. In: Addictive Behaviors. 1995 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 87-92.
@article{cd120d9bd6f5439d868b664a181fbaa0,
title = "Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women",
abstract = "We examined the effects of physical exercise on smoking relapse. Twenty previously sedentary female smokers were randomly assigned to smoking cessation plus exercise or smoking cessation with frequency contact control. The smoking cessation program included 12 professionally led sessions over 12 weeks. Exercise treatment included three supervised exercise sessions per week for 15 weeks. Contact control included three women's health/wellness lectures per week for 15 weeks. Smoking abstinence was validated by carbon monoxide and saliva cotinine. Mean exercise attendance for exercise subjects was 88{\%} with an increase in estimated VO2 of 25{\%}. The percentage of subjects who quit for 24 hours was 80{\%} for the exercise and 90{\%} for the contact group. One subject in the contact group remained abstinent at the end of the 12-week treatment and at 1-, 3-, and 12-month follow-ups, whereas three subjects in the exercise group were abstinent at these time points. These results suggest that exercise training improves short-term quit rates and may prove a useful strategy for long-term maintenance of smoking cessation.",
author = "Marcus, {Bess H.} and Albrecht, {Anna E.} and Raymond Niaura and Taylor, {Elaine R.} and Simkin, {Laurey R.} and Feder, {Susan I.} and David Abrams and Thompson, {Paul D.}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/0306-4603(94)00048-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "87--92",
journal = "Addictive Behaviors",
issn = "0306-4603",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise enhances the maintenance of smoking cessation in women

AU - Marcus, Bess H.

AU - Albrecht, Anna E.

AU - Niaura, Raymond

AU - Taylor, Elaine R.

AU - Simkin, Laurey R.

AU - Feder, Susan I.

AU - Abrams, David

AU - Thompson, Paul D.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - We examined the effects of physical exercise on smoking relapse. Twenty previously sedentary female smokers were randomly assigned to smoking cessation plus exercise or smoking cessation with frequency contact control. The smoking cessation program included 12 professionally led sessions over 12 weeks. Exercise treatment included three supervised exercise sessions per week for 15 weeks. Contact control included three women's health/wellness lectures per week for 15 weeks. Smoking abstinence was validated by carbon monoxide and saliva cotinine. Mean exercise attendance for exercise subjects was 88% with an increase in estimated VO2 of 25%. The percentage of subjects who quit for 24 hours was 80% for the exercise and 90% for the contact group. One subject in the contact group remained abstinent at the end of the 12-week treatment and at 1-, 3-, and 12-month follow-ups, whereas three subjects in the exercise group were abstinent at these time points. These results suggest that exercise training improves short-term quit rates and may prove a useful strategy for long-term maintenance of smoking cessation.

AB - We examined the effects of physical exercise on smoking relapse. Twenty previously sedentary female smokers were randomly assigned to smoking cessation plus exercise or smoking cessation with frequency contact control. The smoking cessation program included 12 professionally led sessions over 12 weeks. Exercise treatment included three supervised exercise sessions per week for 15 weeks. Contact control included three women's health/wellness lectures per week for 15 weeks. Smoking abstinence was validated by carbon monoxide and saliva cotinine. Mean exercise attendance for exercise subjects was 88% with an increase in estimated VO2 of 25%. The percentage of subjects who quit for 24 hours was 80% for the exercise and 90% for the contact group. One subject in the contact group remained abstinent at the end of the 12-week treatment and at 1-, 3-, and 12-month follow-ups, whereas three subjects in the exercise group were abstinent at these time points. These results suggest that exercise training improves short-term quit rates and may prove a useful strategy for long-term maintenance of smoking cessation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028861706&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028861706&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0306-4603(94)00048-4

DO - 10.1016/0306-4603(94)00048-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 7785485

AN - SCOPUS:0028861706

VL - 20

SP - 87

EP - 92

JO - Addictive Behaviors

JF - Addictive Behaviors

SN - 0306-4603

IS - 1

ER -