Excessive daytime sleepiness and adherence to antihypertensive medications among Blacks: Analysis of the counseling African Americans to control hypertension (CAATCH) trial

Natasha J. Williams, Girardin Jean-Louis, Abhishek Pandey, Joseph Ravenell, Carla Boutin-Foster, Gbenga Ogedegbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) often occurs as a result of insufficient sleep, sleep apnea, illicit substance use, and other medical and psychiatric conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that blacks exhibiting EDS would have poorer self-reported adherence to hypertensive medication using cross-sectional data from the Counseling African-Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) trial. Methods: A total of 1,058 hypertensive blacks (average age 57±12 years) participated in CAATCH, a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention for participants who receive care from community health centers in New York City. Data analyzed in this study included baseline sociodemographics, medical history, EDS, and medication adherence. We used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, with a cutoff score of ≥10, to define EDS. Medication adherence was measured using an abbreviated Morisky Medication Adherence scale, with a score >0 indicating nonadherence. Results: Of the sample, 71% were female, 72% received at least a high school education, 51% reported a history of smoking, and 33% had a history of alcohol consumption. Overall, 27% of the participants exhibited EDS, and 44% of those who exhibited EDS were classified as adherent to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusting for effects of age, body mass index, sex, education, and smoking and drinking history indicated that participants who exhibited EDS were more than twice as likely to be nonadherent (odds ratio 2.28, 95% confidence interval 1.42-3.67, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-287
Number of pages5
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 11 2014

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
hypertension
African Americans
Antihypertensive Agents
Counseling
counseling
medication
Hypertension
Smoking
Community Health Centers
sleep
Sex Education
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
smoking
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Psychiatry
Sleep
Body Mass Index
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Blacks
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Hypertension
  • Medication adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Excessive daytime sleepiness and adherence to antihypertensive medications among Blacks : Analysis of the counseling African Americans to control hypertension (CAATCH) trial. / Williams, Natasha J.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Pandey, Abhishek; Ravenell, Joseph; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Ogedegbe, Gbenga.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 8, 11.03.2014, p. 283-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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