Examining the relationship among part-time work arrangements, job satisfaction, and work effort: A study of U.S. college faculty

Xiangmin Liu, Liang Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship among preference for full-time employment, primacy of part-time employment, and work-related outcomes in a nationally representative sample of part-time college instructors. Results based on multilevel cross-classified random effects models indicate that part-time faculty who prefer full-time positions report working on average more hours per week and express greater work-related dissatisfaction than those who choose reduced work hours. Individuals whose part-time jobs are their primary jobs have less job satisfaction but work longer hours than those who treat part-time work as secondary. Finally, those who prefer full-time employment report more negative job satisfaction when the primacy of their part-time jobs is high.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-117
Number of pages31
JournalAdvances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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part-time work
job satisfaction
time
Work effort
Job satisfaction
instructor

Keywords

  • Faculty
  • Job satisfaction
  • Part-time work
  • Work effort

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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