Examining the relations between rumination and adjustment: Do ethnic differences exist between asian and european americans?

Edward C. Chang, William Tsai, Lawrence J. Sanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Past studies have pointed to the dysfunctional nature of rumination in adults. However, past research has not examined ethnic variations. Accordingly, this study examined ethnic differences in rumination in 184 Asian American and 238 European American college students. Consistent with expectations, Asian Americans were found to ruminate more than European Americans. However, rumination was found to have a weaker association with measures of adjustment (viz., affectivity, depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and life satisfaction) in Asian Americans compared with European Americans. As a result of conducting regression analyses to determine whether rumination was a unique predictor of functioning beyond affectivity, we found rumination to be a more distinct and useful predictor of functioning for Asian Americans than for European Americans. Overall, compared with findings for European Americans, our findings indicate that important ethnic differences need to be considered in studying rumination in Asian Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-56
Number of pages11
JournalAsian American Journal of Psychology
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Asian Americans
Regression Analysis
Depression
Students
Research

Keywords

  • Affectivity
  • Ethnicity
  • Psychological adjustment
  • Rumination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Examining the relations between rumination and adjustment : Do ethnic differences exist between asian and european americans? / Chang, Edward C.; Tsai, William; Sanna, Lawrence J.

In: Asian American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 46-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{22ce8583f3ed4c1aaf596db4d2fc27a4,
title = "Examining the relations between rumination and adjustment: Do ethnic differences exist between asian and european americans?",
abstract = "Past studies have pointed to the dysfunctional nature of rumination in adults. However, past research has not examined ethnic variations. Accordingly, this study examined ethnic differences in rumination in 184 Asian American and 238 European American college students. Consistent with expectations, Asian Americans were found to ruminate more than European Americans. However, rumination was found to have a weaker association with measures of adjustment (viz., affectivity, depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and life satisfaction) in Asian Americans compared with European Americans. As a result of conducting regression analyses to determine whether rumination was a unique predictor of functioning beyond affectivity, we found rumination to be a more distinct and useful predictor of functioning for Asian Americans than for European Americans. Overall, compared with findings for European Americans, our findings indicate that important ethnic differences need to be considered in studying rumination in Asian Americans.",
keywords = "Affectivity, Ethnicity, Psychological adjustment, Rumination",
author = "Chang, {Edward C.} and William Tsai and Sanna, {Lawrence J.}",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/a0018821",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "46--56",
journal = "Asian American Journal of Psychology",
issn = "1948-1985",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining the relations between rumination and adjustment

T2 - Do ethnic differences exist between asian and european americans?

AU - Chang, Edward C.

AU - Tsai, William

AU - Sanna, Lawrence J.

PY - 2010/3/1

Y1 - 2010/3/1

N2 - Past studies have pointed to the dysfunctional nature of rumination in adults. However, past research has not examined ethnic variations. Accordingly, this study examined ethnic differences in rumination in 184 Asian American and 238 European American college students. Consistent with expectations, Asian Americans were found to ruminate more than European Americans. However, rumination was found to have a weaker association with measures of adjustment (viz., affectivity, depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and life satisfaction) in Asian Americans compared with European Americans. As a result of conducting regression analyses to determine whether rumination was a unique predictor of functioning beyond affectivity, we found rumination to be a more distinct and useful predictor of functioning for Asian Americans than for European Americans. Overall, compared with findings for European Americans, our findings indicate that important ethnic differences need to be considered in studying rumination in Asian Americans.

AB - Past studies have pointed to the dysfunctional nature of rumination in adults. However, past research has not examined ethnic variations. Accordingly, this study examined ethnic differences in rumination in 184 Asian American and 238 European American college students. Consistent with expectations, Asian Americans were found to ruminate more than European Americans. However, rumination was found to have a weaker association with measures of adjustment (viz., affectivity, depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and life satisfaction) in Asian Americans compared with European Americans. As a result of conducting regression analyses to determine whether rumination was a unique predictor of functioning beyond affectivity, we found rumination to be a more distinct and useful predictor of functioning for Asian Americans than for European Americans. Overall, compared with findings for European Americans, our findings indicate that important ethnic differences need to be considered in studying rumination in Asian Americans.

KW - Affectivity

KW - Ethnicity

KW - Psychological adjustment

KW - Rumination

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649974625&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649974625&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0018821

DO - 10.1037/a0018821

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:78649974625

VL - 1

SP - 46

EP - 56

JO - Asian American Journal of Psychology

JF - Asian American Journal of Psychology

SN - 1948-1985

IS - 1

ER -