Examining perceptions about IQOS heated tobacco product

Consumer studies in Japan and Switzerland

Elizabeth C. Hair, Morgane Bennett, Emily Sheen, Jennifer Cantrell, Jodie Briggs, Zoe Fenn, Jeffrey G. Willett, Donna Vallone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To examine consumer perceptions, attitudes and behaviours regarding the heated tobacco product, IQOS, as well as to document the product's marketing strategies to determine its potential for appealing to youth and young adults. Method Truth Initiative, in collaboration with Flamingo, collected qualitative data via: (1) expert interviews, (2) semiotic analysis of IQOS packing and marketing materials, and (3) 12 focus groups with adults in Switzerland (ages 19-44 years; June 6-9, 2016) and Japan (ages 20-39 years; June 22-24, 2016) (n=68 for both groups). Results Expert interviews and IQOS packing and marketing analyses revealed the product is being marketed as a clean, chic and pure product, which resonated very well in Japan given the strong cultural values of order, cleanliness, quality and respect for others. Focus groups results indicated Japanese IQOS users used the product for socialising with non-smokers. Focus group participants in both Japan and Switzerland reported lower levels of satisfaction with the product relative to combustible cigarettes, although many found the product packaging to be appealing. While participants identified several benefits and barriers related to IQOS, few reported any potential health benefits of use compared with combustible tobacco products. Conclusion IQOS was marketed as a sophisticated, high tech and aspirational product. Because youth and young adults are more interested in such product positioning, this approach raises some concern about youth appeal. This research shows cultural factors appeared to affect the appeal of this messaging, indicating that prevalence and uptake data will likely not be similar from country to country.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)s70-s73
JournalTobacco Control
Volume27
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Marketing
Focus Groups
Switzerland
Tobacco Products
nicotine
Japan
Young Adult
Interviews
Product Packaging
Insurance Benefits
marketing
young adult
appeal
Research
Group
expert
interview
cultural factors
semiotics
respect

Keywords

  • advertising and promotion
  • non-cigarette tobacco products
  • packaging and labelling
  • tobacco industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Examining perceptions about IQOS heated tobacco product : Consumer studies in Japan and Switzerland. / Hair, Elizabeth C.; Bennett, Morgane; Sheen, Emily; Cantrell, Jennifer; Briggs, Jodie; Fenn, Zoe; Willett, Jeffrey G.; Vallone, Donna.

In: Tobacco Control, Vol. 27, 01.11.2018, p. s70-s73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hair, Elizabeth C. ; Bennett, Morgane ; Sheen, Emily ; Cantrell, Jennifer ; Briggs, Jodie ; Fenn, Zoe ; Willett, Jeffrey G. ; Vallone, Donna. / Examining perceptions about IQOS heated tobacco product : Consumer studies in Japan and Switzerland. In: Tobacco Control. 2018 ; Vol. 27. pp. s70-s73.
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abstract = "Objective To examine consumer perceptions, attitudes and behaviours regarding the heated tobacco product, IQOS, as well as to document the product's marketing strategies to determine its potential for appealing to youth and young adults. Method Truth Initiative, in collaboration with Flamingo, collected qualitative data via: (1) expert interviews, (2) semiotic analysis of IQOS packing and marketing materials, and (3) 12 focus groups with adults in Switzerland (ages 19-44 years; June 6-9, 2016) and Japan (ages 20-39 years; June 22-24, 2016) (n=68 for both groups). Results Expert interviews and IQOS packing and marketing analyses revealed the product is being marketed as a clean, chic and pure product, which resonated very well in Japan given the strong cultural values of order, cleanliness, quality and respect for others. Focus groups results indicated Japanese IQOS users used the product for socialising with non-smokers. Focus group participants in both Japan and Switzerland reported lower levels of satisfaction with the product relative to combustible cigarettes, although many found the product packaging to be appealing. While participants identified several benefits and barriers related to IQOS, few reported any potential health benefits of use compared with combustible tobacco products. Conclusion IQOS was marketed as a sophisticated, high tech and aspirational product. Because youth and young adults are more interested in such product positioning, this approach raises some concern about youth appeal. This research shows cultural factors appeared to affect the appeal of this messaging, indicating that prevalence and uptake data will likely not be similar from country to country.",
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