Examining differences in nurses' language, accent, and comprehensibility in nursing home settings based on birth origin and country of education

Laura M. Wagner, Barbara L. Brush, Nicholas G. Castle, Michelle Eaton, Elizabeth Capezuti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As nursing homes turn abroad to fill vacancies, the diverse linguistic backgrounds of nurse hires are creating new challenges in comprehensibility between nurses, providers, and residents. Accents are a natural part of spoken language that may present difficulty even when the parties involved are speaking the same language. We surveyed 1,629 nurses working in 98 nursing homes (NHs) in five U.S. states to determine if and how language difficulties were perceived by nurses and others (e.g. physicians, residents and family members). We found that when participants were asked how often other care team members and residents/families had difficulty understanding them due to language use or accent, foreign born nurses were significantly more likely to report that they experienced difficulty at least some of the time across all groups. This study supports an assessment of nurses' language, accents, and comprehensibility in these settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalGeriatric Nursing
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Sodium Glutamate
Nursing Homes
Language
Nurses
Parturition
Education
International Nurses
Linguistics
Physicians

Keywords

  • Accent
  • Communication
  • English proficiency
  • International nurses
  • Long-term care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology

Cite this

Examining differences in nurses' language, accent, and comprehensibility in nursing home settings based on birth origin and country of education. / Wagner, Laura M.; Brush, Barbara L.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Eaton, Michelle; Capezuti, Elizabeth.

In: Geriatric Nursing, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 47-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wagner, Laura M. ; Brush, Barbara L. ; Castle, Nicholas G. ; Eaton, Michelle ; Capezuti, Elizabeth. / Examining differences in nurses' language, accent, and comprehensibility in nursing home settings based on birth origin and country of education. In: Geriatric Nursing. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 47-51.
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