Examining Barriers and Practices to Recruitment and Retention in Stroke Clinical Trials

Bernadette Boden-Albala, Heather Carman, Lauren Southwick, Nina Parikh, Eric Roberts, Salina Waddy, Dorothy Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The National Institutes of Health policy calls for the inclusion of under-represented groups, such as women and minorities, in clinical research. Poor minority recruitment and retention in stroke clinical trials remain a significant challenge limiting safety and efficacy in a general population. Previous research examines participant barriers to clinical trial involvement, but little is known about the investigator perspective. This study addresses this gap and examines researcher-reported barriers and best practices of minority involvement in stroke clinical trials.

METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative methods, including surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews were used.

RESULTS: In a survey of 93 prominent stroke researchers, 43 (51.2%; 70% response rate) respondents reported proactively setting recruitment goals for minority inclusion, 29 respondents (36.3%) reported requiring cultural competency staff training, and 44 respondents (51.2%) reported using community consultation about trial design. Focus groups and key informant interviews highlighted structural and institutional challenges to recruitment of minorities, including mistrust of the research/medical enterprise, poor communication, and lack of understanding of clinical trials. Researcher-identified best practices included using standardized project management procedures and protocols (eg, realistic budgeting to support challenges in recruitment, such as travel/parking reimbursement for participants), research staff cultural competency and communication training, and developing and fostering community partnerships that guide the research process.

CONCLUSIONS: This study's formative evaluation contributes a new dimension to the literature as it highlights researcher-reported barriers and best practices for enhancing participation of minority populations into stroke clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2232-2237
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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Stroke
Research Personnel
Clinical Trials
Practice Guidelines
Cultural Competency
Focus Groups
Research
Communication
Interviews
Foster Home Care
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Health Policy
Population
Biomedical Research
Referral and Consultation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Safety

Keywords

  • clinical trial
  • ethnic groups
  • health policy
  • National Institutes of Health (US)
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Examining Barriers and Practices to Recruitment and Retention in Stroke Clinical Trials. / Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Carman, Heather; Southwick, Lauren; Parikh, Nina; Roberts, Eric; Waddy, Salina; Edwards, Dorothy.

In: Stroke, Vol. 46, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 2232-2237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boden-Albala, Bernadette ; Carman, Heather ; Southwick, Lauren ; Parikh, Nina ; Roberts, Eric ; Waddy, Salina ; Edwards, Dorothy. / Examining Barriers and Practices to Recruitment and Retention in Stroke Clinical Trials. In: Stroke. 2015 ; Vol. 46, No. 8. pp. 2232-2237.
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