Evidence that nitrous oxide can maintain anaesthesia after induction with barbiturates

C. Blakemore, M. J. Donaghy, L. Maffei, J. A. Movshon, D. Rose, R. C. Van Sluyters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three cats were prepared under short acting barbiturate methohexital: approximately 30 mg/kg, given i.v., as required, over about 1.5 hr). Each cat was then paralyzed by continuous infusion of gallamine (7.5 mg/kg.hr) and artificially ventilated with 80% N 2O/19% O 2/1% CO 2. The electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and expired P(CO 2) were monitored throughout the ensuing neurophysiological experiment. Maximum P(CO 2) was held at 4%. Apart from a reduction in E.E.G. spindling there was no discernible change throughout the 30-32 hr of the experiments. Even a firm pinch to the forepaw failed to desynchronize the E.E.G. However, desynchronization did occur if the concentration of N 2O was reduced to 65% but did not if it was raised again to 80%. After 28-29 hr relaxant infusion was stopped: 1-2 hr later each cat was able to breathe the N 2O mixture for itself. In this unparalyzed state the animals were still adequately anesthetized, having very little spontaneous movement and only a weak withdrawal reflex. Finally, after 30-32 hr, a light dose of methohexital (3 mg/kg) did not affect the E.E.G. although larger doses did cause barbiturate spindling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume237
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1974

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Barbiturates
Nitrous Oxide
Electroencephalography
Carbon Monoxide
Anesthesia
Methohexital
Cats
Gallamine Triethiodide
Reflex
Electrocardiography
Light
barbituric acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Blakemore, C., Donaghy, M. J., Maffei, L., Movshon, J. A., Rose, D., & Van Sluyters, R. C. (1974). Evidence that nitrous oxide can maintain anaesthesia after induction with barbiturates. Journal of Physiology, 237(2).

Evidence that nitrous oxide can maintain anaesthesia after induction with barbiturates. / Blakemore, C.; Donaghy, M. J.; Maffei, L.; Movshon, J. A.; Rose, D.; Van Sluyters, R. C.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 237, No. 2, 1974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blakemore, C, Donaghy, MJ, Maffei, L, Movshon, JA, Rose, D & Van Sluyters, RC 1974, 'Evidence that nitrous oxide can maintain anaesthesia after induction with barbiturates', Journal of Physiology, vol. 237, no. 2.
Blakemore, C. ; Donaghy, M. J. ; Maffei, L. ; Movshon, J. A. ; Rose, D. ; Van Sluyters, R. C. / Evidence that nitrous oxide can maintain anaesthesia after induction with barbiturates. In: Journal of Physiology. 1974 ; Vol. 237, No. 2.
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