Evidence for working memory storage operations in perceptual cortex

Kartik Sreenivasan, Caterina Gratton, Jason Vytlacil, Mark D'Esposito

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Isolating the short-term storage component of working memory (WM) from the myriad of associated executive processes has been an enduring challenge. Recent efforts have identified patterns of activity in visual regions that contain information about items being held in WM. However, it remains unclear (1) whether these representations withstand intervening sensory input and (2) how communication between multimodal association cortex and the unimodal perceptual regions supporting WM representations is involved in WM storage. We present evidence that the features of a face held in WM are stored within face-processing regions, that these representations persist across subsequent sensory input, and that information about the match between sensory input and a memory representation is relayed forward from perceptual to prefrontal regions. Participants were presented with a series of probe faces and indicated whether each probe matched a target face held in WM. We parametrically varied the feature similarity between the probe and target faces. Activity within face-processing regions scaled linearly with the degree of feature similarity between the probe face and the features of the target face, suggesting that the features of the target face were stored in these regions. Furthermore, directed connectivity measures revealed that the direction of information flow that was optimal for performance was from sensory regions that stored the features of the target face to dorsal prefrontal regions, supporting the notion that sensory input is compared to representations stored within perceptual regions and is subsequently relayed forward. Together, these findings indicate that WM storage operations are carried out within perceptual cortex.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)117-128
    Number of pages12
    JournalCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience
    Volume14
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

    Fingerprint

    Short-Term Memory
    Communication

    Keywords

    • Functional connectivity
    • Working memory

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cognitive Neuroscience
    • Behavioral Neuroscience

    Cite this

    Evidence for working memory storage operations in perceptual cortex. / Sreenivasan, Kartik; Gratton, Caterina; Vytlacil, Jason; D'Esposito, Mark.

    In: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 117-128.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Sreenivasan, Kartik ; Gratton, Caterina ; Vytlacil, Jason ; D'Esposito, Mark. / Evidence for working memory storage operations in perceptual cortex. In: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 117-128.
    @article{bb62a1bdc70c4c01a8be36389f294453,
    title = "Evidence for working memory storage operations in perceptual cortex",
    abstract = "Isolating the short-term storage component of working memory (WM) from the myriad of associated executive processes has been an enduring challenge. Recent efforts have identified patterns of activity in visual regions that contain information about items being held in WM. However, it remains unclear (1) whether these representations withstand intervening sensory input and (2) how communication between multimodal association cortex and the unimodal perceptual regions supporting WM representations is involved in WM storage. We present evidence that the features of a face held in WM are stored within face-processing regions, that these representations persist across subsequent sensory input, and that information about the match between sensory input and a memory representation is relayed forward from perceptual to prefrontal regions. Participants were presented with a series of probe faces and indicated whether each probe matched a target face held in WM. We parametrically varied the feature similarity between the probe and target faces. Activity within face-processing regions scaled linearly with the degree of feature similarity between the probe face and the features of the target face, suggesting that the features of the target face were stored in these regions. Furthermore, directed connectivity measures revealed that the direction of information flow that was optimal for performance was from sensory regions that stored the features of the target face to dorsal prefrontal regions, supporting the notion that sensory input is compared to representations stored within perceptual regions and is subsequently relayed forward. Together, these findings indicate that WM storage operations are carried out within perceptual cortex.",
    keywords = "Functional connectivity, Working memory",
    author = "Kartik Sreenivasan and Caterina Gratton and Jason Vytlacil and Mark D'Esposito",
    year = "2014",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.3758/s13415-013-0246-7",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "14",
    pages = "117--128",
    journal = "Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience",
    issn = "1530-7026",
    publisher = "Springer New York",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Evidence for working memory storage operations in perceptual cortex

    AU - Sreenivasan, Kartik

    AU - Gratton, Caterina

    AU - Vytlacil, Jason

    AU - D'Esposito, Mark

    PY - 2014/1/1

    Y1 - 2014/1/1

    N2 - Isolating the short-term storage component of working memory (WM) from the myriad of associated executive processes has been an enduring challenge. Recent efforts have identified patterns of activity in visual regions that contain information about items being held in WM. However, it remains unclear (1) whether these representations withstand intervening sensory input and (2) how communication between multimodal association cortex and the unimodal perceptual regions supporting WM representations is involved in WM storage. We present evidence that the features of a face held in WM are stored within face-processing regions, that these representations persist across subsequent sensory input, and that information about the match between sensory input and a memory representation is relayed forward from perceptual to prefrontal regions. Participants were presented with a series of probe faces and indicated whether each probe matched a target face held in WM. We parametrically varied the feature similarity between the probe and target faces. Activity within face-processing regions scaled linearly with the degree of feature similarity between the probe face and the features of the target face, suggesting that the features of the target face were stored in these regions. Furthermore, directed connectivity measures revealed that the direction of information flow that was optimal for performance was from sensory regions that stored the features of the target face to dorsal prefrontal regions, supporting the notion that sensory input is compared to representations stored within perceptual regions and is subsequently relayed forward. Together, these findings indicate that WM storage operations are carried out within perceptual cortex.

    AB - Isolating the short-term storage component of working memory (WM) from the myriad of associated executive processes has been an enduring challenge. Recent efforts have identified patterns of activity in visual regions that contain information about items being held in WM. However, it remains unclear (1) whether these representations withstand intervening sensory input and (2) how communication between multimodal association cortex and the unimodal perceptual regions supporting WM representations is involved in WM storage. We present evidence that the features of a face held in WM are stored within face-processing regions, that these representations persist across subsequent sensory input, and that information about the match between sensory input and a memory representation is relayed forward from perceptual to prefrontal regions. Participants were presented with a series of probe faces and indicated whether each probe matched a target face held in WM. We parametrically varied the feature similarity between the probe and target faces. Activity within face-processing regions scaled linearly with the degree of feature similarity between the probe face and the features of the target face, suggesting that the features of the target face were stored in these regions. Furthermore, directed connectivity measures revealed that the direction of information flow that was optimal for performance was from sensory regions that stored the features of the target face to dorsal prefrontal regions, supporting the notion that sensory input is compared to representations stored within perceptual regions and is subsequently relayed forward. Together, these findings indicate that WM storage operations are carried out within perceptual cortex.

    KW - Functional connectivity

    KW - Working memory

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84897530036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84897530036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.3758/s13415-013-0246-7

    DO - 10.3758/s13415-013-0246-7

    M3 - Article

    VL - 14

    SP - 117

    EP - 128

    JO - Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience

    JF - Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience

    SN - 1530-7026

    IS - 1

    ER -