Evaluation of an IBAD thin-film process as an alternative method for surface incorporation of bioceramics on dental implants

A study in dogs

Paulo G Coelho, Marcelo Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Thin-film bioceramic coatings are potential alternatives to overcome the limitations provided by other commercially available coating techniques like PSHA, where variable bioceramic dissolution added to a metalloceramic weak link are process- inherent. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the overall and site specific (to 0.5 mm from implant surface) levels of osseoactivity around a thin-film (IBAD processed) coated titanium alloy implant versus a non surface modified (sand-blasted/acid etched) titanium alloy implant in a canine model. The surgical model comprised the proximal tibiae epiphyses with four implants placed in each limb remaining for 2 and 4 weeks in-vivo. 10 mg/Kg oxytetracycline was administered 48 hours prior to euthanization. The limbs were retrieved by sharp dissection, reduced to blocks, and subsequently nondecalcified processed for fluorescent microscopy. Micrographs (20x mag) were acquired around the implant perimeter and merged for overall biological response evaluations, and four micrographs (40x mag. subdivided in rectangles) were acquired along one of the implant sides for tetracycline labeled area fraction quantification. The results showed biocompatible and osseoconductive properties for the thin-film coated and uncoated titanium alloy implants. Tetracycline labeled area fraction analyses showed that the thin-film coated implants presented significantly higher overall and site specific osseoactivity levels at 2 and 4 weeks. The site specific osseoactivity values were significantly higher compared to overall values for control and thin-film coated implants at both times in-vivo. According to the results obtained in this study, thin-film coated implants enhanced biological response at the early implantation times evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberPMID: 20944888
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Oral Science
Volume13
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Dental Implants
Titanium
Dogs
Tetracycline
Extremities
Anatomic Models
Oxytetracycline
Epiphyses
Tibia
Canidae
Dissection
Microscopy
Acids

Cite this

Evaluation of an IBAD thin-film process as an alternative method for surface incorporation of bioceramics on dental implants : A study in dogs. / Coelho, Paulo G; Suzuki, Marcelo.

In: Journal of Applied Oral Science, Vol. 13, No. 1, PMID: 20944888, 03.2005, p. 87-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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