Evaluating a ten questions screen for childhood disability: Reliability and internal structure in different cultures

M. S. Durkin, W. Wang, Patrick Shrout, S. S. Zaman, Z. M. Hasan, P. Desai, L. L. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper uses five strategies to evaluate the reliability and other measurement qualities of the Ten Questions screen for childhood disability. The screen was administered for 22,125 children, aged 2-9 years, in Bangladesh, Jamaica and Pakistan. The test-retest approach involving small sub-samples was useful for assessing reliability of overall screening results, but not of individual items with low prevalence. Alternative strategies focus on the internal consistency and structure of the screen as well as item analyses. They provide evidence of similar and comparable qualities of measurement in the three culturally divergent populations, indicating that the screen is likely to produce comparable data across cultures. One of the questions, however, correlates with the other questions differently in Jamaica, where it appears to "over-identify" children as seriously disabled. The methods and findings reported here have general applications for the design and evaluation of questionnaires for epidemiologic research, particularly when the goal is to gather comparable data in geographically and culturally diverse settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-666
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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Jamaica
Bangladesh
Pakistan
Research
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Child development disorders
  • Cross-cultural comparison
  • Disability Epidemiologic methods
  • Questionnaires
  • Reliability
  • Reproducibility of results

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Evaluating a ten questions screen for childhood disability : Reliability and internal structure in different cultures. / Durkin, M. S.; Wang, W.; Shrout, Patrick; Zaman, S. S.; Hasan, Z. M.; Desai, P.; Davidson, L. L.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 48, No. 5, 1995, p. 657-666.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Durkin, M. S. ; Wang, W. ; Shrout, Patrick ; Zaman, S. S. ; Hasan, Z. M. ; Desai, P. ; Davidson, L. L. / Evaluating a ten questions screen for childhood disability : Reliability and internal structure in different cultures. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 1995 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 657-666.
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