Ethnic minority clients' perceptions of the significance of race in cross-racial therapy relationships

Doris F. Chang, Patricia Yoon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    In this consensual qualitative research study, 23 ethnic minority clients were interviewed to assess perceptions of race in their recent therapy with a White therapist. Participants' responses were coded into an average of seven (out of 22) categories. The majority believed that White therapists could not understand key aspects of their experiences and subsequently avoided broaching racial/cultural issues in therapy. However, many felt that racial differences were minimized if the therapist was compassionate, accepting, and comfortable discussing racial, ethnic and/or cultural (REC) issues. A subgroup expressed positive expectancies of racial mismatch, and perceived disadvantages associated with racial matching. Results suggest that participants' constructions of race are multidimensional and support recommendations that therapists acquire skills for addressing racial perceptions that may impact the therapy relationship.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)567-582
    Number of pages16
    JournalPsychotherapy Research
    Volume21
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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    Qualitative Research
    Therapeutics

    Keywords

    • Alliance
    • Culture and psychotherapy
    • Qualitative research methods
    • Racial/ethnic minorities

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Clinical Psychology

    Cite this

    Ethnic minority clients' perceptions of the significance of race in cross-racial therapy relationships. / Chang, Doris F.; Yoon, Patricia.

    In: Psychotherapy Research, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.09.2011, p. 567-582.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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