Ethics, Public Policy, and Global Warming

Dale Jamieson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    There are many uncertainties concerning climate change, but a rough international consensus has emerged that a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide from its pre-industrial baseline is likely to lead to a 2.5 degree centigrade increase in the earths mean surface temperature by the middle of the next century. Such a warming would have diverse impacts on human activities and would likely be catastrophic for many plants and nonhuman animals. The authors contention is that the problems engendered by the possibility of climate change are not purely scientific but also concern how we ought to live and how humans should relate to each other and to the rest of nature; and these are problems of ethics and politics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)139-153
    Number of pages15
    JournalScience, Technology & Human Values
    Volume17
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1992

    Fingerprint

    Global warming
    Climate change
    public policy
    climate change
    moral philosophy
    Carbon dioxide
    Animals
    animal
    Earth (planet)
    uncertainty
    politics
    Temperature
    Public Policy
    Climate Change
    Global Warming
    Public policy
    Uncertainty
    Nature
    Carbon Dioxide
    Nonhuman Animals

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Anthropology
    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
    • Philosophy
    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Economics and Econometrics
    • Engineering(all)
    • Human-Computer Interaction

    Cite this

    Ethics, Public Policy, and Global Warming. / Jamieson, Dale.

    In: Science, Technology & Human Values, Vol. 17, No. 2, 1992, p. 139-153.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Jamieson, Dale. / Ethics, Public Policy, and Global Warming. In: Science, Technology & Human Values. 1992 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 139-153.
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