Environmental and Individual Factors Affecting Menu Labeling Utilization: A Qualitative Research Study

Jennifer Schindler, Kamila Kiszko, Courtney Abrams, Nadia Islam, Brian D. Elbel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Obesity is a prominent public health concern that disproportionally affects low-income and minority populations. Recent policies mandating the posting of calories on menus in fast-food chain restaurants have not proven to uniformly influence food choice. This qualitative research study used focus groups to study individual and environmental factors affecting the use of these menu labels among low-income minority populations. Ten focus groups targeting low-income residents (n=105) were held at various community organizations throughout New York City over a 9-month period in 2011. The focus groups were conducted in Spanish, English, or a combination of both languages. In late 2011 and early 2012, transcripts were coded through the process of thematic analysis using Atlas.ti for naturally emerging themes, influences, and determinants of food choice. Few participants used menu labels, despite awareness. The most frequently cited as barriers to menu label use included: price and time constraints, confusion and lack of understanding about caloric values, as well as the priority of preference, hunger, and habitual ordering habits. Based on the individual and external influences on food choice that often take priority over calorie consideration, a modified approach may be necessary to make menu labels more effective and user-friendly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-672
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume113
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

menu planning
Qualitative Research
qualitative analysis
Focus Groups
Poverty
focus groups
Food
food choices
income
Fast Foods
Restaurants
Confusion
Hunger
Food Chain
Atlases
Habits
Language
Public Health
Obesity
fast foods

Keywords

  • Food access
  • Menu labeling legislation
  • Nutrition policy
  • Obesity prevention
  • Qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Environmental and Individual Factors Affecting Menu Labeling Utilization : A Qualitative Research Study. / Schindler, Jennifer; Kiszko, Kamila; Abrams, Courtney; Islam, Nadia; Elbel, Brian D.

In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 113, No. 5, 2013, p. 667-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schindler, Jennifer ; Kiszko, Kamila ; Abrams, Courtney ; Islam, Nadia ; Elbel, Brian D. / Environmental and Individual Factors Affecting Menu Labeling Utilization : A Qualitative Research Study. In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2013 ; Vol. 113, No. 5. pp. 667-672.
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