'Englishness' on the imperial circuit

Mutiny tours in colonial South Asia

Manu Goswami

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Dominant analyses of the generative conditions and the particular forms assumed by 'Englishness' in the late nineteenth century continue to territorialise its formation within the metropole. This paper seeks to challenge the reified binary topography of metropole/periphery by situating dominant articulations of 'Englishness' within the territorial and discursive ground of colonial South Asia. A recognition of the broader, asymmetrically structured field of imperial social relations, I argue, requires a reconceptualization of 'Englishness' as an imperial formation. Through a critical analysis of the official historiography on the mutiny, the spatial and discursive practices of mutiny tours, and their constitutive role in shaping the identity of tourists, this paper attempts to show the intersections between 'Englishness', England and Empire.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)54-84
    Number of pages31
    JournalJournal of Historical Sociology
    Volume9
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Mar 1996

    Fingerprint

    South Asia
    historiography
    Social Relations
    tourist
    nineteenth century
    geography
    Englishness
    Mutiny
    Colonies

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • History
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    'Englishness' on the imperial circuit : Mutiny tours in colonial South Asia. / Goswami, Manu.

    In: Journal of Historical Sociology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 03.1996, p. 54-84.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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