En las Manos de Dios [in God's Hands]: Religious and Other Forms of Coping among Latinos with Arthritis

Ana Abraido-Lanza, Elizabeth Vásquez, Sandra E. Echeverría

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study tested a theoretical model concerning religious, passive, and active coping; pain; and psychological adjustment among a sample of 200 Latinos with arthritis. Respondents reported using high levels of religious coping. A path analysis indicated that religious coping was correlated with active but not with passive coping. Religious coping was directly related to psychological well-being. Passive coping was associated with greater pain and worse adjustment. The effects of active coping on pain, depression, and psychological well-being were entirely indirect, mediated by acceptance of illness and self-efficacy. These findings warrant more research on the mechanisms that mediate the relationship between coping and health. This study contributes to a growing literature on religious coping among people with chronic illness, as well as contributing to a historically under-studied ethnic group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-102
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

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Hispanic Americans
Arthritis
Hand
Pain
Psychology
Social Adjustment
Self Efficacy
Ethnic Groups
Chronic Disease
Theoretical Models
Depression
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

En las Manos de Dios [in God's Hands] : Religious and Other Forms of Coping among Latinos with Arthritis. / Abraido-Lanza, Ana; Vásquez, Elizabeth; Echeverría, Sandra E.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 72, No. 1, 01.02.2004, p. 91-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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