Emissions from biogas fueled engine generator compared to a fuel cell

Philip R. Goodrich, Richard J. Huelskamp, David Nelson, David Schmidt, R. Vance Morey, Dennis Haubenschild, Mathew Drewitz, Paul Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

A highly successful biogas project on a Minnesota 800-cow dairy has been operating for 5 yr. The emissions of a conventional combustion engine coupled with an induction generator (genset) producing electricity for the grid was compared with a fuel cell using the same biogas. The emissions of NOx, CO, THC, and SO2 from the fuel cell were much less than from the engine generator. The pressure swing absorber gas cleanup process, prior to introducing the gas to the fuel cell, removed almost all (15 ppm H2S remains of original 5000 ppm) of the critical contaminant gas. The CO2 was decreased from 40 to 10%. A biofilter would be used to collect and recycle the H2S into the soil along with the filter material. The biofilter is not expected to sequester the CO2 and that would be ultimately released to the local atmosphere. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 98th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Minneapolis, MN 6/21-24/2005).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA
Volume2005
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
EventAir and Waste Management Association's - 98th annual Conference and Exhibition - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Jun 21 2005Jun 24 2005

Fingerprint

Biogas
fuel cell
biogas
Biofilters
Fuel cells
engine
Engines
Gases
gas
Dairies
Asynchronous generators
cleanup
electricity
Electricity
Impurities
filter
Soils
pollutant
atmosphere
soil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Emissions from biogas fueled engine generator compared to a fuel cell. / Goodrich, Philip R.; Huelskamp, Richard J.; Nelson, David; Schmidt, David; Morey, R. Vance; Haubenschild, Dennis; Drewitz, Mathew; Burns, Paul.

In: Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA, Vol. 2005, 01.12.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Goodrich, Philip R. ; Huelskamp, Richard J. ; Nelson, David ; Schmidt, David ; Morey, R. Vance ; Haubenschild, Dennis ; Drewitz, Mathew ; Burns, Paul. / Emissions from biogas fueled engine generator compared to a fuel cell. In: Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. 2005 ; Vol. 2005.
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