Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2014

Blair N. Coleman, Brian Rostron, Sarah E. Johnson, Bridget K. Ambrose, Jennifer Pearson, Cassandra A. Stanton, Baoguang Wang, Cristine Delnevo, Maansi Bansal-Travers, Heather L. Kimmel, Maciej L. Goniewicz, Raymond Niaura, David Abrams, Kevin P. Conway, Nicolette Borek, Wilson M. Compton, Andrew Hyland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in the USA is increasing. As such, it is critical to understand who uses e-cigarettes, how e-cigarettes are used and what types of products are prevalent. This study assesses patterns of current e-cigarette use among daily and non-daily adult users in the 2013-2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.Methods: We examined the proportion of current adult e-cigarette users (n=3642) reporting infrequent use (use on 'some days' and use on 0-2 of the past 30 days), moderate use (use on 'some days' and use on >2 of the past 30 days) and daily use. We examined demographic characteristics, use of other tobacco products and e-cigarette product characteristics overall and by use category. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated using Poisson regression to assess correlates of daily e-cigarette use.Results: Among the 5.5% of adult current e-cigarette users in the PATH Study, 42.2% reported infrequent use, 36.5% reported moderate use and 21.3% reported daily use. Cigarette smokers who quit in the past year were more likely to report daily e-cigarette use, compared with current smokers (aPR=3.21, 95% CI=2.75 to 3.76). Those who reported using rechargeable or refillable devices were more likely to report daily use compared with those who did not use these devices (aPR=1.95, 95% CI=1.44 to 2.65 and aPR=2.10, 95% CI=1.75 to 2.52, respectively).Conclusions: The majority of e-cigarette users in this study reported less than daily use. Compared with non-daily use, daily use was associated with being a former smoker; however, cross-sectional data limits our ability to establish the temporality or directionality of such associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTobacco Control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 30 2017

Fingerprint

nicotine
Tobacco
electronics
Health
health
Tobacco Products
Population
Equipment and Supplies
Electronic Cigarettes
Demography
regression
ability

Keywords

  • Electronic nicotine delivery devices
  • Non-cigarette tobacco products
  • Surveillance and monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Coleman, B. N., Rostron, B., Johnson, S. E., Ambrose, B. K., Pearson, J., Stanton, C. A., ... Hyland, A. (Accepted/In press). Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2014. Tobacco Control. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053462

Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2014. / Coleman, Blair N.; Rostron, Brian; Johnson, Sarah E.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Pearson, Jennifer; Stanton, Cassandra A.; Wang, Baoguang; Delnevo, Cristine; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Kimmel, Heather L.; Goniewicz, Maciej L.; Niaura, Raymond; Abrams, David; Conway, Kevin P.; Borek, Nicolette; Compton, Wilson M.; Hyland, Andrew.

In: Tobacco Control, 30.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coleman, BN, Rostron, B, Johnson, SE, Ambrose, BK, Pearson, J, Stanton, CA, Wang, B, Delnevo, C, Bansal-Travers, M, Kimmel, HL, Goniewicz, ML, Niaura, R, Abrams, D, Conway, KP, Borek, N, Compton, WM & Hyland, A 2017, 'Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2014', Tobacco Control. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053462
Coleman, Blair N. ; Rostron, Brian ; Johnson, Sarah E. ; Ambrose, Bridget K. ; Pearson, Jennifer ; Stanton, Cassandra A. ; Wang, Baoguang ; Delnevo, Cristine ; Bansal-Travers, Maansi ; Kimmel, Heather L. ; Goniewicz, Maciej L. ; Niaura, Raymond ; Abrams, David ; Conway, Kevin P. ; Borek, Nicolette ; Compton, Wilson M. ; Hyland, Andrew. / Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2014. In: Tobacco Control. 2017.
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abstract = "Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in the USA is increasing. As such, it is critical to understand who uses e-cigarettes, how e-cigarettes are used and what types of products are prevalent. This study assesses patterns of current e-cigarette use among daily and non-daily adult users in the 2013-2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.Methods: We examined the proportion of current adult e-cigarette users (n=3642) reporting infrequent use (use on 'some days' and use on 0-2 of the past 30 days), moderate use (use on 'some days' and use on >2 of the past 30 days) and daily use. We examined demographic characteristics, use of other tobacco products and e-cigarette product characteristics overall and by use category. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated using Poisson regression to assess correlates of daily e-cigarette use.Results: Among the 5.5{\%} of adult current e-cigarette users in the PATH Study, 42.2{\%} reported infrequent use, 36.5{\%} reported moderate use and 21.3{\%} reported daily use. Cigarette smokers who quit in the past year were more likely to report daily e-cigarette use, compared with current smokers (aPR=3.21, 95{\%} CI=2.75 to 3.76). Those who reported using rechargeable or refillable devices were more likely to report daily use compared with those who did not use these devices (aPR=1.95, 95{\%} CI=1.44 to 2.65 and aPR=2.10, 95{\%} CI=1.75 to 2.52, respectively).Conclusions: The majority of e-cigarette users in this study reported less than daily use. Compared with non-daily use, daily use was associated with being a former smoker; however, cross-sectional data limits our ability to establish the temporality or directionality of such associations.",
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AU - Coleman, Blair N.

AU - Rostron, Brian

AU - Johnson, Sarah E.

AU - Ambrose, Bridget K.

AU - Pearson, Jennifer

AU - Stanton, Cassandra A.

AU - Wang, Baoguang

AU - Delnevo, Cristine

AU - Bansal-Travers, Maansi

AU - Kimmel, Heather L.

AU - Goniewicz, Maciej L.

AU - Niaura, Raymond

AU - Abrams, David

AU - Conway, Kevin P.

AU - Borek, Nicolette

AU - Compton, Wilson M.

AU - Hyland, Andrew

PY - 2017/6/30

Y1 - 2017/6/30

N2 - Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in the USA is increasing. As such, it is critical to understand who uses e-cigarettes, how e-cigarettes are used and what types of products are prevalent. This study assesses patterns of current e-cigarette use among daily and non-daily adult users in the 2013-2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.Methods: We examined the proportion of current adult e-cigarette users (n=3642) reporting infrequent use (use on 'some days' and use on 0-2 of the past 30 days), moderate use (use on 'some days' and use on >2 of the past 30 days) and daily use. We examined demographic characteristics, use of other tobacco products and e-cigarette product characteristics overall and by use category. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated using Poisson regression to assess correlates of daily e-cigarette use.Results: Among the 5.5% of adult current e-cigarette users in the PATH Study, 42.2% reported infrequent use, 36.5% reported moderate use and 21.3% reported daily use. Cigarette smokers who quit in the past year were more likely to report daily e-cigarette use, compared with current smokers (aPR=3.21, 95% CI=2.75 to 3.76). Those who reported using rechargeable or refillable devices were more likely to report daily use compared with those who did not use these devices (aPR=1.95, 95% CI=1.44 to 2.65 and aPR=2.10, 95% CI=1.75 to 2.52, respectively).Conclusions: The majority of e-cigarette users in this study reported less than daily use. Compared with non-daily use, daily use was associated with being a former smoker; however, cross-sectional data limits our ability to establish the temporality or directionality of such associations.

AB - Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in the USA is increasing. As such, it is critical to understand who uses e-cigarettes, how e-cigarettes are used and what types of products are prevalent. This study assesses patterns of current e-cigarette use among daily and non-daily adult users in the 2013-2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.Methods: We examined the proportion of current adult e-cigarette users (n=3642) reporting infrequent use (use on 'some days' and use on 0-2 of the past 30 days), moderate use (use on 'some days' and use on >2 of the past 30 days) and daily use. We examined demographic characteristics, use of other tobacco products and e-cigarette product characteristics overall and by use category. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated using Poisson regression to assess correlates of daily e-cigarette use.Results: Among the 5.5% of adult current e-cigarette users in the PATH Study, 42.2% reported infrequent use, 36.5% reported moderate use and 21.3% reported daily use. Cigarette smokers who quit in the past year were more likely to report daily e-cigarette use, compared with current smokers (aPR=3.21, 95% CI=2.75 to 3.76). Those who reported using rechargeable or refillable devices were more likely to report daily use compared with those who did not use these devices (aPR=1.95, 95% CI=1.44 to 2.65 and aPR=2.10, 95% CI=1.75 to 2.52, respectively).Conclusions: The majority of e-cigarette users in this study reported less than daily use. Compared with non-daily use, daily use was associated with being a former smoker; however, cross-sectional data limits our ability to establish the temporality or directionality of such associations.

KW - Electronic nicotine delivery devices

KW - Non-cigarette tobacco products

KW - Surveillance and monitoring

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