Effects of sensory integration intervention on self-stimulating and self-injurious behaviors

Sinclair A. Smith, Bracha Press, Kristie Koenig, Moya Kinnealey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study compared the effects of occupational therapy, using a sensory integration (SI) approach and a control intervention of tabletop activities, on the frequency of self-stimulating behaviors in seven children 8-19 years of age with pervasive developmental delay and mental retardation. Daily 15-min videotape segments of the subjects were recorded before, immediately after, and 1 hour after either SI or control interventions performed during alternating weeks for 4 weeks. Each 15-min video segment was evaluated by investigators to determine the frequency of self-stimulating behaviors. The results indicate that self-stimulating behaviors were significantly reduced by 11% one hour after SI intervention in comparison with the tabletop activity intervention (p = 0.02). There was no change immediately following SI or tabletop interventions. Daily ratings of self-stimulating behavior frequency by classroom teachers using a 5-point scale correlated significantly with the frequency counts taken by the investigators (r = 0.32, p < 0.001). These results suggest that the sensory integration approach is effective in reducing self-stimulating behaviors, which interfere with the ability to participate in more functional activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)418-425
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume59
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2005

Fingerprint

Self-Injurious Behavior
Research Personnel
Videotape Recording
Aptitude
Occupational Therapy
Intellectual Disability

Keywords

  • sensory integration
  • sensory integration intervention
  • self-injurious behaviors
  • self-stimulating behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Effects of sensory integration intervention on self-stimulating and self-injurious behaviors. / Smith, Sinclair A.; Press, Bracha; Koenig, Kristie; Kinnealey, Moya.

In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 59, No. 4, 07.2005, p. 418-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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