Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on infant anthropometric outcomes

Andrea Deierlein, Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Linda S. Adair, Amy H. Herring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) influence infant postnatal growth. Study design: Participants were from the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition study, a prospective pregnancy cohort. Term infants with weight or length measurements at approximately 6 months were included (n = 363). Multivariable regression estimated associations for weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ), and weight-for-length z-scores (WLZ) and rapid infant weight gain with categorical maternal exposures defined with the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations. Results: Pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity were associated with higher WAZ (linear regression coefficient [β], 0.32; 95% CI, 0.04-0.61) and WLZ (β, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.02-0.76), respectively. Pre-pregnancy BMI was not associated with LAZ. Excessive GWG was associated with higher WAZ (β, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.15-0.62) and LAZ (β, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.12-0.56). Excessive GWG ≥200% of recommended amount was associated with higher WAZ (β, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.28-1.07), LAZ (β, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.06-0.83), and WLZ (β, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.04-0.82). Risk of rapid weight gain increased across maternal exposure categories; however, none of the estimates were significant. Conclusions: Pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG are modifiable intrauterine exposures that influence infant postnatal anthropometric outcomes. Further investigation with infant body composition measurements is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-226
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume158
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

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Weight Gain
Body Mass Index
Pregnancy
Weights and Measures
Maternal Exposure
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Body Composition
Linear Models
Obesity
Prospective Studies
Growth
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on infant anthropometric outcomes. / Deierlein, Andrea; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Adair, Linda S.; Herring, Amy H.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 158, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 221-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deierlein, Andrea ; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria ; Adair, Linda S. ; Herring, Amy H. / Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on infant anthropometric outcomes. In: The Journal of Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 158, No. 2. pp. 221-226.
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abstract = "Objective: To determine whether pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) influence infant postnatal growth. Study design: Participants were from the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition study, a prospective pregnancy cohort. Term infants with weight or length measurements at approximately 6 months were included (n = 363). Multivariable regression estimated associations for weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ), and weight-for-length z-scores (WLZ) and rapid infant weight gain with categorical maternal exposures defined with the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations. Results: Pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity were associated with higher WAZ (linear regression coefficient [β], 0.32; 95{\%} CI, 0.04-0.61) and WLZ (β, 0.39; 95{\%} CI, 0.02-0.76), respectively. Pre-pregnancy BMI was not associated with LAZ. Excessive GWG was associated with higher WAZ (β, 0.39; 95{\%} CI, 0.15-0.62) and LAZ (β, 0.34; 95{\%} CI, 0.12-0.56). Excessive GWG ≥200{\%} of recommended amount was associated with higher WAZ (β, 0.68; 95{\%} CI, 0.28-1.07), LAZ (β, 0.45; 95{\%} CI, 0.06-0.83), and WLZ (β, 0.43; 95{\%} CI, 0.04-0.82). Risk of rapid weight gain increased across maternal exposure categories; however, none of the estimates were significant. Conclusions: Pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG are modifiable intrauterine exposures that influence infant postnatal anthropometric outcomes. Further investigation with infant body composition measurements is warranted.",
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