Effects of individual, occupational, and industrial characteristics on earnings

Intersections of race and gender

Barbara Kilbourne, Paula England, Kurt Beron

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Critics of the “women’s agenda” in both research and policy have complained of its exclusive focus on the experiences of white women. They maintain that as a result of this focus, we know relatively little about the experiences of black women in the labor market compared to those of white women. This article concentrates on generalizations regarding the effects of experience, education, marital status, occupational characteristics, and industrial sector on earnings. To investigate how these variables interact with gender and race to affect pay, we use fixed effects on panel data (1966–81) from the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS). We use regression decomposition to ascertain (1) what factors explain the gender gap in earnings and whether these factors explain the same portion of this gap among blacks and whites, and (2) what factors explain the race gap in earnings and whether these factors explain the same portion of this gap among women and men.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1149-1176
    Number of pages28
    JournalSocial Forces
    Volume72
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    gender
    experience
    marital status
    critic
    labor market
    regression
    education
    Fixed Effects
    Agenda
    Education
    Decomposition
    Panel Data
    Labour Market
    Marital Status

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • History
    • Anthropology
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Effects of individual, occupational, and industrial characteristics on earnings : Intersections of race and gender. / Kilbourne, Barbara; England, Paula; Beron, Kurt.

    In: Social Forces, Vol. 72, No. 4, 1994, p. 1149-1176.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kilbourne, Barbara ; England, Paula ; Beron, Kurt. / Effects of individual, occupational, and industrial characteristics on earnings : Intersections of race and gender. In: Social Forces. 1994 ; Vol. 72, No. 4. pp. 1149-1176.
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