Effects of Earnings-Supplement Policies on Adult Economic and Middle-Childhood Outcomes Differ for the "Hardest to Employ"

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Katherine A. Magnuson, Johannes M. Bos, Joann Hsueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Data from the Minnesota Family Investment Program and the New Hope demonstration were used to determine whether experimental effects of antipoverty policies differ by parents' risk for nonemployment. Using propensity score analysis, increases in employment and income were largest in the harder-to-employ halves of both samples. However, only children in the moderately hard-to-employ quartiles (50th to 75th percentile) consistently showed improvements in school and behavior outcomes. The very-hardest-to-employ 25% experienced decreases in school engagement, and increases in aggressive behaviors, despite substantial increases in parental employment and income. In this group, increases in maternal depression, reductions in regular family routines, and smaller increases in job stability and center-based child care occurred. These factors may have counteracted the potential benefits of increased income on children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1500-1521
Number of pages22
JournalChild Development
Volume74
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2003

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supplement
childhood
Economics
income
Hope
economics
Propensity Score
only child
Only Child
aggressive behavior
Child Care
child care
school
parents
Parents
Mothers
Depression
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Effects of Earnings-Supplement Policies on Adult Economic and Middle-Childhood Outcomes Differ for the "Hardest to Employ". / Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Magnuson, Katherine A.; Bos, Johannes M.; Hsueh, Joann.

In: Child Development, Vol. 74, No. 5, 09.2003, p. 1500-1521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshikawa, Hirokazu ; Magnuson, Katherine A. ; Bos, Johannes M. ; Hsueh, Joann. / Effects of Earnings-Supplement Policies on Adult Economic and Middle-Childhood Outcomes Differ for the "Hardest to Employ". In: Child Development. 2003 ; Vol. 74, No. 5. pp. 1500-1521.
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