Effects of dopamine transporter and receptor polymorphisms on smoking cessation in a bupropion clinical trial

Caryn Lerman, E. Paul Wileyto, Janet Audrain, Angela Pinto, Susan Kucharski, Raymond Niaura, Peter G. Shields, Larry H. Hawk, Shiva Krishnan, Leonard H. Epstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the role of dopaminergic genes in prospective smoking cessation and response to bupropion treatment in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Smokers of European ancestry (N = 418) provided blood samples for genetic analysis and received either bupropion or placebo (10 weeks) plus counseling. Assessments included the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) genotype, dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) genotype, demographic factors, and nicotine dependence. Smoking status was verified at the end of treatment (EOT) and at 6-month follow-up. The results provided evidence for a significant DRD2 X SLC6A3 interaction effect on prolonged smoking abstinence and time to relapse at EOT, independent of treatment condition. Such effects were no longer significant at 6-month follow-up, however. These results provide the first evidence from a prospective clinical trial that genes that alter dopamine function may influence smoking cessation and relapse during the treatment phase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-548
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Fingerprint

Bupropion
Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Dopamine Receptors
Smoking Cessation
Clinical Trials
Smoking
Genotype
Placebos
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Tobacco Use Disorder
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Controlled Clinical Trials
Genes
Counseling
Dopamine
Demography

Keywords

  • Bupropion
  • Dopamine
  • Genetics
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Effects of dopamine transporter and receptor polymorphisms on smoking cessation in a bupropion clinical trial. / Lerman, Caryn; Wileyto, E. Paul; Audrain, Janet; Pinto, Angela; Kucharski, Susan; Niaura, Raymond; Shields, Peter G.; Hawk, Larry H.; Krishnan, Shiva; Epstein, Leonard H.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 5, 09.2003, p. 541-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lerman, C, Wileyto, EP, Audrain, J, Pinto, A, Kucharski, S, Niaura, R, Shields, PG, Hawk, LH, Krishnan, S & Epstein, LH 2003, 'Effects of dopamine transporter and receptor polymorphisms on smoking cessation in a bupropion clinical trial', Health Psychology, vol. 22, no. 5, pp. 541-548. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.22.5.541
Lerman, Caryn ; Wileyto, E. Paul ; Audrain, Janet ; Pinto, Angela ; Kucharski, Susan ; Niaura, Raymond ; Shields, Peter G. ; Hawk, Larry H. ; Krishnan, Shiva ; Epstein, Leonard H. / Effects of dopamine transporter and receptor polymorphisms on smoking cessation in a bupropion clinical trial. In: Health Psychology. 2003 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 541-548.
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