Effect on atmospheric CO2 from seasonal variations in the high latitude ocean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Data from the North Pacific gyre, Bering Sea, and North Atlantic show large seasonal fluctuations in the pCO2 of surface waters. The seasonal variation in these high latitudes apparently has a generic pattern: higher surface water pCO2 in winter and lower in summer. Satellite data will eventually help decipher the relative effects of temperature and biological production in the seasonal carbon cycle, but as yet little work has been done on what possible role the seasonality of pCO2 in the high latitudes might have on the average value of atmospheric pCO2. Here I develop a model that shows the average value for atmospheric pCO2 depends upon the ratio of the rates at which the ocean/atmosphere system moves toward equilibrium values during the summer and winter conditions of the high latitude ocean.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-157
Number of pages5
JournalAdvances in Space Research
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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annual variations
Surface waters
polar regions
oceans
seasonal variation
surface water
winter
summer
ocean
Bering Sea
carbon cycle
atmosphere-ocean system
biological production
Satellites
gyre
Carbon
seasonality
satellite data
atmospheres
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Effect on atmospheric CO2 from seasonal variations in the high latitude ocean. / Volk, Tyler.

In: Advances in Space Research, Vol. 9, No. 8, 1989, p. 153-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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