Educational risk and resilience in African-American youth

context, self, action, and outcomes in school.

J. P. Connell, M. B. Spencer, J. L. Aber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the empirical validity of a model of human motivation as it applies to school success and failure in 3 independent samples of 10- to 16-year-old African-American youth. Specifically, we assessed how indicators of context, self, and action relate to measures of risk and resilient outcomes in school in 3 different samples, using 3 different measurement strategies. Correlational and path analyses on the 3 data sets supported the empirical validity of the model. African-American youth's experience of their parents' school involvement predicted a composite of self-system processes, which in turn predicted the subjects' reports of their engagement in school. Engagement then predicted school performance and adjustment. The data supported a reciprocal path from action to context, suggesting that youth who show more disaffected patterns of behavior and emotion in school experience less support from their families than those reporting more engaged patterns of action. Implications for program and policy decisions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-506
Number of pages14
JournalChild Development
Volume65
Issue number2 Spec No
StatePublished - Apr 1994

Fingerprint

African Americans
resilience
school
school success
Social Adjustment
experience
parents
emotion
American
Motivation
Emotions
Parents
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Educational risk and resilience in African-American youth : context, self, action, and outcomes in school. / Connell, J. P.; Spencer, M. B.; Aber, J. L.

In: Child Development, Vol. 65, No. 2 Spec No, 04.1994, p. 493-506.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d5f7027aa0d440fca6dc4dd0ccdeb3a6,
title = "Educational risk and resilience in African-American youth: context, self, action, and outcomes in school.",
abstract = "This study examined the empirical validity of a model of human motivation as it applies to school success and failure in 3 independent samples of 10- to 16-year-old African-American youth. Specifically, we assessed how indicators of context, self, and action relate to measures of risk and resilient outcomes in school in 3 different samples, using 3 different measurement strategies. Correlational and path analyses on the 3 data sets supported the empirical validity of the model. African-American youth's experience of their parents' school involvement predicted a composite of self-system processes, which in turn predicted the subjects' reports of their engagement in school. Engagement then predicted school performance and adjustment. The data supported a reciprocal path from action to context, suggesting that youth who show more disaffected patterns of behavior and emotion in school experience less support from their families than those reporting more engaged patterns of action. Implications for program and policy decisions are discussed.",
author = "Connell, {J. P.} and Spencer, {M. B.} and Aber, {J. L.}",
year = "1994",
month = "4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "493--506",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2 Spec No",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educational risk and resilience in African-American youth

T2 - context, self, action, and outcomes in school.

AU - Connell, J. P.

AU - Spencer, M. B.

AU - Aber, J. L.

PY - 1994/4

Y1 - 1994/4

N2 - This study examined the empirical validity of a model of human motivation as it applies to school success and failure in 3 independent samples of 10- to 16-year-old African-American youth. Specifically, we assessed how indicators of context, self, and action relate to measures of risk and resilient outcomes in school in 3 different samples, using 3 different measurement strategies. Correlational and path analyses on the 3 data sets supported the empirical validity of the model. African-American youth's experience of their parents' school involvement predicted a composite of self-system processes, which in turn predicted the subjects' reports of their engagement in school. Engagement then predicted school performance and adjustment. The data supported a reciprocal path from action to context, suggesting that youth who show more disaffected patterns of behavior and emotion in school experience less support from their families than those reporting more engaged patterns of action. Implications for program and policy decisions are discussed.

AB - This study examined the empirical validity of a model of human motivation as it applies to school success and failure in 3 independent samples of 10- to 16-year-old African-American youth. Specifically, we assessed how indicators of context, self, and action relate to measures of risk and resilient outcomes in school in 3 different samples, using 3 different measurement strategies. Correlational and path analyses on the 3 data sets supported the empirical validity of the model. African-American youth's experience of their parents' school involvement predicted a composite of self-system processes, which in turn predicted the subjects' reports of their engagement in school. Engagement then predicted school performance and adjustment. The data supported a reciprocal path from action to context, suggesting that youth who show more disaffected patterns of behavior and emotion in school experience less support from their families than those reporting more engaged patterns of action. Implications for program and policy decisions are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028412576&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028412576&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 493

EP - 506

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 2 Spec No

ER -