Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics

Yu Zhang, James J W Lee, Ramanathan Srikanth, Brian R. Lawn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass-ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1201-1208
Number of pages8
JournalDental Materials
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Ceramics
Esthetics
Fracture toughness
Dental Porcelain
Porcelain
Glass ceramics
Veneers
Dental prostheses
Cementation
Dental Prosthesis
Prosthetics
Bending strength
Restoration
Durability
Lithium
Dentin
Crowns
Prostheses and Implants
Tooth
Processing

Keywords

  • Edge chipping
  • Flexural fracture
  • Glass-ceramic
  • Graded glass-zirconia
  • Monolithic restorations
  • Zirconia-based ceramic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics. / Zhang, Yu; Lee, James J W; Srikanth, Ramanathan; Lawn, Brian R.

In: Dental Materials, Vol. 29, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 1201-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Yu ; Lee, James J W ; Srikanth, Ramanathan ; Lawn, Brian R. / Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics. In: Dental Materials. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. 12. pp. 1201-1208.
@article{2dd28921331145948a32616f48b793b9,
title = "Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics",
abstract = "Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass-ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics.",
keywords = "Edge chipping, Flexural fracture, Glass-ceramic, Graded glass-zirconia, Monolithic restorations, Zirconia-based ceramic",
author = "Yu Zhang and Lee, {James J W} and Ramanathan Srikanth and Lawn, {Brian R.}",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.dental.2013.09.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "1201--1208",
journal = "Dental Materials",
issn = "0109-5641",
publisher = "Elsevier Science",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics

AU - Zhang, Yu

AU - Lee, James J W

AU - Srikanth, Ramanathan

AU - Lawn, Brian R.

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass-ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics.

AB - Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass-ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics.

KW - Edge chipping

KW - Flexural fracture

KW - Glass-ceramic

KW - Graded glass-zirconia

KW - Monolithic restorations

KW - Zirconia-based ceramic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84887992388&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84887992388&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.dental.2013.09.004

DO - 10.1016/j.dental.2013.09.004

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 1201

EP - 1208

JO - Dental Materials

JF - Dental Materials

SN - 0109-5641

IS - 12

ER -