Economic analysis of networking technologies for rural developing regions

Shridhar Mubaraq Mishra, John Hwang, Dick Filippini, Reza Moazzami, Lakshminarayanan Subramanian, Tom Du

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Providing network connectivity to rural regions in the developing world is an economically challenging problem especially given the low income levels and low population densities in such regions. Many existing connectivity technologies incur a high deployment cost that limits their affordability. Leveraging several emerging wireless technologies, this paper presents the case for economically viable networks in rural developing regions. We use the Akshaya Network located in Kerala, India as a specific case study, and show that a wireless network using WiFi for the backhaul, CDMA450 for the access network, and shared PCs for end user devices has the lowest deployment cost. However, if we include the expected spectrum licensing cost for CDMA450, a network with lease exempt spectrum using WiFi for the backhaul and WiMax for access is the most economically attractive option. Even with license exemption, regulatory costs comprise nearly half the total cost in the WiFi/WiMax case suggesting the possibility of significant improvement in network economics with more favorable regulatory policies. Finally, we also demonstrate the business case for a WiFi/CDMA450 network. with nearly fully subsidized cellular handsets as end user devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternet and Network Economics - First International Workshop, WINE 2005, Proceedings
Pages184-194
Number of pages11
Volume3828 LNCS
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event1st International Workshop on Internet and Network Economics, WINE 2005 - Hong Kong, China
Duration: Dec 15 2005Dec 17 2005

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3828 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other1st International Workshop on Internet and Network Economics, WINE 2005
CountryChina
CityHong Kong
Period12/15/0512/17/05

Fingerprint

Economic Analysis
Economic analysis
Networking
Wi-Fi
Economics
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Wimax
Costs
Licensure
WiMAX
Wireless Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Population Density
Network Connectivity
India
Wireless networks
Wireless Networks
Lowest
Connectivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Mishra, S. M., Hwang, J., Filippini, D., Moazzami, R., Subramanian, L., & Du, T. (2005). Economic analysis of networking technologies for rural developing regions. In Internet and Network Economics - First International Workshop, WINE 2005, Proceedings (Vol. 3828 LNCS, pp. 184-194). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3828 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/11600930_19

Economic analysis of networking technologies for rural developing regions. / Mishra, Shridhar Mubaraq; Hwang, John; Filippini, Dick; Moazzami, Reza; Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan; Du, Tom.

Internet and Network Economics - First International Workshop, WINE 2005, Proceedings. Vol. 3828 LNCS 2005. p. 184-194 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3828 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mishra, SM, Hwang, J, Filippini, D, Moazzami, R, Subramanian, L & Du, T 2005, Economic analysis of networking technologies for rural developing regions. in Internet and Network Economics - First International Workshop, WINE 2005, Proceedings. vol. 3828 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 3828 LNCS, pp. 184-194, 1st International Workshop on Internet and Network Economics, WINE 2005, Hong Kong, China, 12/15/05. https://doi.org/10.1007/11600930_19
Mishra SM, Hwang J, Filippini D, Moazzami R, Subramanian L, Du T. Economic analysis of networking technologies for rural developing regions. In Internet and Network Economics - First International Workshop, WINE 2005, Proceedings. Vol. 3828 LNCS. 2005. p. 184-194. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/11600930_19
Mishra, Shridhar Mubaraq ; Hwang, John ; Filippini, Dick ; Moazzami, Reza ; Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan ; Du, Tom. / Economic analysis of networking technologies for rural developing regions. Internet and Network Economics - First International Workshop, WINE 2005, Proceedings. Vol. 3828 LNCS 2005. pp. 184-194 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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