Earthshine observations of the earth's reflectance

P. R. Goode, J. Qiu, V. Yurchyshyn, J. Hickey, M. C. Chu, E. Kolbe, C. T. Brown, S. E. Koonin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Regular photometric observations of the moon's "ashen light" (earthshine) from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) since December 1998 have quantified the earth's optical reflectance. We find large (∼ 5%) daily variations in the reflectance due to large-scale weather changes on the other side of the globe. Separately, we find comparable hourly variations during the course of many nights as the earth's rotation changes that portion of the earth in view. Our data imply an average terrestrial albedo of 0.297±0.005, which agrees with that from simulations based upon both changing snow and ice cover and satellite-derived cloud cover (0.296±0.002). However, we find seasonal variations roughly twice those of the simulation, with the earth being brightest in the spring. Our results suggest that long-term earthshine observations are a useful monitor of the earth's albedo. Comparison with more limited earthshine observations during 1994-1995 show a marginally higher albedo then.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1671-1674
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2001

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reflectance
albedo
Earth albedo
snow cover
solar observatories
Earth rotation
cloud cover
globes
annual variations
bears
weather
night
monitors
ice
bear
simulation
ice cover
diurnal variation
Moon
observatory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Goode, P. R., Qiu, J., Yurchyshyn, V., Hickey, J., Chu, M. C., Kolbe, E., ... Koonin, S. E. (2001). Earthshine observations of the earth's reflectance. Geophysical Research Letters, 28(9), 1671-1674. https://doi.org/10.1029/2000GL012580

Earthshine observations of the earth's reflectance. / Goode, P. R.; Qiu, J.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Hickey, J.; Chu, M. C.; Kolbe, E.; Brown, C. T.; Koonin, S. E.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 9, 01.05.2001, p. 1671-1674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goode, PR, Qiu, J, Yurchyshyn, V, Hickey, J, Chu, MC, Kolbe, E, Brown, CT & Koonin, SE 2001, 'Earthshine observations of the earth's reflectance', Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 9, pp. 1671-1674. https://doi.org/10.1029/2000GL012580
Goode PR, Qiu J, Yurchyshyn V, Hickey J, Chu MC, Kolbe E et al. Earthshine observations of the earth's reflectance. Geophysical Research Letters. 2001 May 1;28(9):1671-1674. https://doi.org/10.1029/2000GL012580
Goode, P. R. ; Qiu, J. ; Yurchyshyn, V. ; Hickey, J. ; Chu, M. C. ; Kolbe, E. ; Brown, C. T. ; Koonin, S. E. / Earthshine observations of the earth's reflectance. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2001 ; Vol. 28, No. 9. pp. 1671-1674.
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