Early Childhood Internalizing Problems in Mexican- and Dominican-Origin Children

The Role of Cultural Socialization and Parenting Practices

Esther Calzada, R. Gabriela Barajas-Gonzalez, Keng Yen Huang, Laurie Brotman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined mother- and teacher-rated internalizing behaviors (i.e., anxiety, depression, and somatization symptoms) among young children using longitudinal data from a community sample of 661 Mexican and Dominican families and tested a conceptual model in which parenting (mother's socialization messages and parenting practices) predicted child internalizing problems 12 months later. Children evidenced elevated levels of mother-rated anxiety at both time points. Findings also supported the validity of the proposed parenting model for both Mexican and Dominican families. Although there were different pathways to child anxiety, depression, and somatization among Mexican and Dominican children, socialization messages and authoritarian parenting were positively associated with internalizing symptoms for both groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-562
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2017

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Socialization
Parenting
Anxiety
Mothers
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Early Childhood Internalizing Problems in Mexican- and Dominican-Origin Children : The Role of Cultural Socialization and Parenting Practices. / Calzada, Esther; Barajas-Gonzalez, R. Gabriela; Huang, Keng Yen; Brotman, Laurie.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 4, 04.07.2017, p. 551-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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