Dynamic regulation of the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia californica in response to changes in the ambient tactile environment

Thomas M. Fischer, Jean W. Yuan, Thomas J. Carew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The state of an animal's environment can be viewed as a source of information that can be used to regulate both ongoing and future behavior. The present work examined how the ambient environment can regulate the Aplysia siphon withdrawal reflex (SWR) by changing the environment between calm and turbulent. Results indicate that the SWR is dynamically regulated on the basis of variations in external conditions, so that responsiveness (measured as both reflex duration and threshold) is matched to the state of the environment. Prior exposure to a noxious stimulus (tailshock) has selective effects on this regulation, suggesting the existence of multiple regulatory mechanisms. Further, neurophysiological correlates to behavioral observations were measured in sensory and motor neurons. This will allow for a detailed cellular analysis of environmental information-processing in this system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1209-1222
Number of pages14
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume114
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Aplysia
Touch
Reflex
Motor Neurons
Sensory Receptor Cells
Automatic Data Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Dynamic regulation of the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia californica in response to changes in the ambient tactile environment. / Fischer, Thomas M.; Yuan, Jean W.; Carew, Thomas J.

In: Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 114, No. 6, 2000, p. 1209-1222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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