Dynamic nanomechanical analysis of the vocal fold structure in excised larynges

Gregory R. Dion, Paulo Coelho, Stephanie Teng, Malvin N. Janal, Milan R. Amin, Ryan C. Branski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: Quantification of clinical outcomes after vocal fold (VF) interventions is challenging with current technology. High-speed digital imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of excised larynges assess intact laryngeal function, but do not provide critical biomechanical information. We developed a protocol to quantify tissue properties in intact, excised VFs using dynamic nanomechanical analysis (nano-DMA) to obtain precise biomechanical properties in the micrometer scale. Study Design: Experimental animal study. Methods: Three pig larynges were bisected in the sagittal plane, maintaining an intact anterior commissure, and subjected to nano-DMA at nine locations with a 250-μm flat-tip punch and frequency sweep load profile (10-105 Hz, 1,000 μN peak force) across the free edge of the VF and inferiorly along the conus elasticus. Results: Storage, loss, and complex moduli increased inferiorly from the free edge. Storage moduli increased from a mean of 32.3 kPa (range, 6.5-55.38 kPa) at the free edge to 46.3kPa (range, 7.4-71.6) 5 mm below the free edge, and 71.4 kPa (range, 33.7-112 kPa) 1 cm below the free edge. Comparable values were 11.6 kPa (range, 5.0-20.0 kPa), 16.7 kPa (range, 5.7-26.8 kPa), and 22.6 kPa (range, 9.7-38.0 kPa) for loss modulus, and 35.7 kPa (range, 14.4-56.4 kPa), 50.1 kPa (range, 18.7-72.8 kPa), and 75.4 kPa (range, 42.0-116.0 kPa) for complex modulus. Another larynx repeatedly frozen and thawed during technique development had similarly increased storage, loss, and complex modulus trends across locations. Conclusions: Nano-DMA of the intact hemilarynx provides a platform for quantification of biomechanical responses to a myriad of therapeutic interventions to complement data from high-speed imaging and OCT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLaryngoscope
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

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Vocal Cords
Larynx
Optical Coherence Tomography
Research Design
Swine
Technology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Complex moduli
  • Larynx
  • Loss moduli
  • Mechanical testing
  • Storage moduli
  • Tan delta
  • Vocal fold
  • Voice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Dion, G. R., Coelho, P., Teng, S., Janal, M. N., Amin, M. R., & Branski, R. C. (Accepted/In press). Dynamic nanomechanical analysis of the vocal fold structure in excised larynges. Laryngoscope. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.26410

Dynamic nanomechanical analysis of the vocal fold structure in excised larynges. / Dion, Gregory R.; Coelho, Paulo; Teng, Stephanie; Janal, Malvin N.; Amin, Milan R.; Branski, Ryan C.

In: Laryngoscope, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dion, Gregory R. ; Coelho, Paulo ; Teng, Stephanie ; Janal, Malvin N. ; Amin, Milan R. ; Branski, Ryan C. / Dynamic nanomechanical analysis of the vocal fold structure in excised larynges. In: Laryngoscope. 2016.
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AU - Amin, Milan R.

AU - Branski, Ryan C.

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N2 - Objectives/Hypothesis: Quantification of clinical outcomes after vocal fold (VF) interventions is challenging with current technology. High-speed digital imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of excised larynges assess intact laryngeal function, but do not provide critical biomechanical information. We developed a protocol to quantify tissue properties in intact, excised VFs using dynamic nanomechanical analysis (nano-DMA) to obtain precise biomechanical properties in the micrometer scale. Study Design: Experimental animal study. Methods: Three pig larynges were bisected in the sagittal plane, maintaining an intact anterior commissure, and subjected to nano-DMA at nine locations with a 250-μm flat-tip punch and frequency sweep load profile (10-105 Hz, 1,000 μN peak force) across the free edge of the VF and inferiorly along the conus elasticus. Results: Storage, loss, and complex moduli increased inferiorly from the free edge. Storage moduli increased from a mean of 32.3 kPa (range, 6.5-55.38 kPa) at the free edge to 46.3kPa (range, 7.4-71.6) 5 mm below the free edge, and 71.4 kPa (range, 33.7-112 kPa) 1 cm below the free edge. Comparable values were 11.6 kPa (range, 5.0-20.0 kPa), 16.7 kPa (range, 5.7-26.8 kPa), and 22.6 kPa (range, 9.7-38.0 kPa) for loss modulus, and 35.7 kPa (range, 14.4-56.4 kPa), 50.1 kPa (range, 18.7-72.8 kPa), and 75.4 kPa (range, 42.0-116.0 kPa) for complex modulus. Another larynx repeatedly frozen and thawed during technique development had similarly increased storage, loss, and complex modulus trends across locations. Conclusions: Nano-DMA of the intact hemilarynx provides a platform for quantification of biomechanical responses to a myriad of therapeutic interventions to complement data from high-speed imaging and OCT.

AB - Objectives/Hypothesis: Quantification of clinical outcomes after vocal fold (VF) interventions is challenging with current technology. High-speed digital imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of excised larynges assess intact laryngeal function, but do not provide critical biomechanical information. We developed a protocol to quantify tissue properties in intact, excised VFs using dynamic nanomechanical analysis (nano-DMA) to obtain precise biomechanical properties in the micrometer scale. Study Design: Experimental animal study. Methods: Three pig larynges were bisected in the sagittal plane, maintaining an intact anterior commissure, and subjected to nano-DMA at nine locations with a 250-μm flat-tip punch and frequency sweep load profile (10-105 Hz, 1,000 μN peak force) across the free edge of the VF and inferiorly along the conus elasticus. Results: Storage, loss, and complex moduli increased inferiorly from the free edge. Storage moduli increased from a mean of 32.3 kPa (range, 6.5-55.38 kPa) at the free edge to 46.3kPa (range, 7.4-71.6) 5 mm below the free edge, and 71.4 kPa (range, 33.7-112 kPa) 1 cm below the free edge. Comparable values were 11.6 kPa (range, 5.0-20.0 kPa), 16.7 kPa (range, 5.7-26.8 kPa), and 22.6 kPa (range, 9.7-38.0 kPa) for loss modulus, and 35.7 kPa (range, 14.4-56.4 kPa), 50.1 kPa (range, 18.7-72.8 kPa), and 75.4 kPa (range, 42.0-116.0 kPa) for complex modulus. Another larynx repeatedly frozen and thawed during technique development had similarly increased storage, loss, and complex modulus trends across locations. Conclusions: Nano-DMA of the intact hemilarynx provides a platform for quantification of biomechanical responses to a myriad of therapeutic interventions to complement data from high-speed imaging and OCT.

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